MORIAH -- Walk down the upstairs hall at the historic Lee House at just the right hour, and you might see a ghost.

In Crown Point, there's a home where, some say, a kilt-wearing Scotsman stalks the halls wrapped in chains and dripping phantom water that was likely the result of his immersion in nearby Lake Champlain.

An Indian burial mound in Keene is home to strange sounds, while some say a hanged murderer's ghost haunts an Elizabethtown museum.

VIOLENT DEATHS REPLAYED?

All over the Adirondack Mountains, there are stories of ghosts occupying particular places, usually old houses, but sometimes cemeteries and other locations.

Some people believe a violent death ties a spirit to a particular place, or that a holographic electrical force generated by such a departure lingers, replaying the event for future generations of frightened residents.

Several places in Elizabethtown are reported to have ghosts, including the Old County Courthouse, Deer's Head Inn and the Riverside Cemetery.

The ghost of hanged murderer Henry De Bosnys is the restless spirit at the Adirondack History Center Museum, where his skull is on display. The building was once the town school.

Museum Educator Lindsay Pontius said De Bosnys was hanged April 27, 1883, at the courthouse in Elizabethtown. He had been convicted of the murder of his wife, Elizabeth, and sentenced to death.

"That may not have been his first crime. We believe he killed someone before he came here, a woman he met in Burlington, a laundress."

De Bosnys was accused of beating his wife to death in Essex and hiding her body under leaves at the side of the road. He denied his guilt, but a jury took only 10 minutes to convict him.

Museum Director Margaret Gibbs said one of the museum's summer interns reported seeing Henry De Bosnys's ghost, later discovering one of her ancestors had been involved with the hanging in an official capacity.

Gibbs said it got even scarier later.

"We were in the office, and we found a newspaper clipping about the case in the copier. No one here had put it there. It hadn't been taken out in years. We were looking at it, then the lights went out."

The unexplained power failure threw the museum into darkness.

"That was frightening," Gibbs said.

Before his execution, De Bosnys sold his body for $15 and used the money to buy a suit. In the years before his death, he had been a solider of fortune all over the world, even serving in the U.S. 7th Cavalry at the time Col. George Armstrong Custer died at the Little Bighorn.

THE GHOST'S NAME IS FRED'

Another ghost, Gibbs said, walks at the Deer's Head Inn down the street.

"It's a man, upstairs. There were some odd deaths there in the 1800s."

At the Hand House in Elizabethtown, a spectral woman has been reported moving from room to room.

"They're not quite sure who she is," Gibbs said. "They smell her perfume. She walks through the halls."

In Port Henry, some say they've seen a ghost in the hallways at the historic Lee House, now senior citizens apartments. The ghost is believed to be that of someone who died there when the place was a famous inn.

Down the street from the Lee House, said Moriah Town Supervisor Thomas Scozzafava, "there's a ghost in the Town Hall, on the third floor. It's been seen looking out the window."

Late-night workers in the building have also reported hearing someone walking around on the closed-off third floor.

"Strange things happen at the Town Hall," said Moriah resident Barbara Brassard, who once worked there. "The ghost's name is Fred. We didn't know much more about him."

That specter is thought to be someone who perished there when the three-story brick building was owned by mining company Witherbee Sherman.

NOOSE STILL AROUND BROKEN NECK

In Moriah, the Big Hollow Indian burial ground is sometimes the site of strange visions.

A man who approached the place said he saw gold coins falling slowly through the air and Indians waving their arms as smoke swirled about them.

"It was an illusion or a mirage. When you got closer, it wasn't there," Brassard said.

There's also an Indian burial mound at the bottom of Spruce Hill in Keene.

About a half-mile off the road is an island of trees in the middle of a field, but no birds or animals seem to live there. The mound has been the source of strange noises heard late at night.

One of the most haunted places in the Adirondacks is believed to be the old St. Pierre House on Bridge Road in Crown Point.

"A woman who was allegedly hanged there haunts the place," Brassard said. "She's been seen walking the halls."

The woman, wearing a maid's uniform, has been seen wailing in the third-floor hallway, the noose still around her broken neck, Brassard said.

Others have said there's a second ghost at the former inn, which dates back to the 18th century. The black-bearded Scotsman walks the halls bound in chains, dripping wet.

As he moves along, water drips around his feet, but the floor stays dry. He also moans and clanks the chains.

"That's pretty scary. I'd run if I saw that," Brassard said.

lmckinstry@pressrepublican.com

(Note: Many of the haunted places listed here are private property. They should not be entered or explored without the owner's permission.)

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