PLATTSBURGH — The city OK'd the mayor to sign an $8,900 agreement with Architectural & Engineering Design Associates that could help put the former Plattsburgh Air Force Base chaplain's house on the market.

That structure currently shares its 52 U.S. Oval lot with the City Recreation Center, or gym.

Per the Thursday night resolution, Architectural & Engineering Design Associates, or AEDA, would subdivide that lot.

City Corporation Counsel Dean Schneller said the shared lot was blocking the City of Plattsburgh from listing the unused structure as a surplus property and selling it. 

"The decision to deem it surplus has not yet been made," Schneller said, "but in order to be confronted with that, we first need to subdivide it off." 

PAST USE

The chaplain's house, though now vacant, has had more recent purposes than housing the U.S. Air Force clergyman.

"It was used years ago for some kind of police services," Schneller said.

And, in 2013, local chiropractor Dr. Jonathan Mulholland opened a practice there called The Ideal Athlete.

The building's most recent lease, Schneller said, ended two years ago. 

POTENTIAL TO SELL

Since that lease agreement was terminated, the city has solely performed upkeep. 

"There are some repairs that are necessary to lease it again," Schneller said. "It didn't make financial sense, based on the market-for-lease rate versus the potential value for sale." 

So, once subdivided, putting the building up for sale would be an option. 

City Director of Community Development Matthew Miller said there had already been "considerable interest from the public" on that front.

"I have heard from two or three separate people over the last six months," he said. 

SCOPE OF WORK

For the nearly $9,000 lump sum fee, Plattsburgh-based AEDA have signed on to perform a string of tasks. 

According to the agreement, the list includes performing the boundary survey and actual subdivision, as well as submission of the varying applications to the respective zoning and planning boards. 

AEDA will also be prepping a common driveway access easement.

The proposal excluded various other forms of work like state/federal approvals, traffic studies, property inspection and environmental survey/inspections, including those related to asbestos, lead and/or PCBs. 

"AEDA can perform any of these services, should they become necessary," the agreement says. "All such fees will be paid for directly by the owner at the time of submission." 

 

Email McKenzie Delisle: 

mdelisle@pressrepublican.com

Twitter: @McKenzieDelisle

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