Press-Republican

August 13, 2013

Neurologist opens office in Plattsburgh

By JEFF MEYERS
Press-Republican

---- — PLATTSBURGH — The newly opened practice of Dr. Boris Chulpayev in Plattsburgh has brought a much-needed specialty to the region.

As a neurologist, Chulpayev fills a void in providing neurological care for the community on a full-time basis.

“There has been a shortage of neurologists in the area,” Chulpayev said from this office on the CVPH Medical Center campus at 206 Cornelia St. recently.

“I felt there was a big need for neurological services here,” he said of his decision to open a practice in the greater Plattsburgh community.

Neurology is the study and treatment of conditions involving the nervous system, and ranges from headaches to Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS).

“Neurology is a very vast field,” Chulpayev said. “We’re here to provide the best care for patients no matter what kind of disease they may have.

“It’s a rapidly growing field,” he added. “Over the past 10 years, there have been major breakthroughs in neurological therapies. We’re on the cutting edge of many exciting new treatments for those diseases.”

A major role of the neurologist is to correctly diagnose conditions so that the best treatment plans can be established, Chulpayev explained, whether it’s the treatment of chronic headaches or the management of ALS.

“A lot of these conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, are more prevalent in older populations,” he said, noting that increased prevalence of many of the diseases he works with are growing simply because people are living longer.

That requires the neurologist to not only have a good relationship with the patient but also with family members and caregivers, he added.

“It’s very important to provide patients and their families with appropriate information to develop a successful treatment plan. We are not only treating the patient but the family as well. It’s important that the family be involved from the beginning.”

One of the most common conditions Chulpayev and other neurologists work with is the headache. About 5 percent of the population deals with severe, chronic headaches.

“There are a lot of different types of headaches and a lot of options nowadays for treatment of headaches,” he said. “The neurologist’s arsenal for treating headaches has expanded tremendously.”

Chulpayev graduated from Yeshiva High School in Atlanta and completed his undergraduate work at SUNY Albany. His mother, Dr. Dora Pinkhasova, had taken a position in the Albany Medical Center’s Neurology Program, and the family moved to upstate New York.

In fact, family history has played a big role in Chulpayev’s decision to enter medicine.

“A majority of my family members are in the medical field, either as doctors or dentists. I believe it’s a calling to become a doctor, to be able to devote your time to helping others.”

Chulpayev began his medical training at St. George’s University in Grenada. In fact, the two years he spent on the island were balanced between his studies and helping the island’s residents rebound from Hurricane Ivan, which had caused widespread damage on Grenada just before he arrived.

“It was a humbling experience,” he said of those years at St. George’s. “In the U.S., we take running water and electricity for granted. We didn’t always have those luxuries (on Grenada). Having the opportunity to help those people (recover from the hurricane) was very rewarding for me and my colleagues.”

He then returned to New York City to continue his medical studies, including time at AltantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City, N.J., and the University of Florida at Tampa.

The opportunity to open a practice in Plattsburgh brought him back to upstate New York and gave him the chance to be closer to his family.

Chulpayev typically receives patients referred to him from area doctors or from CVPH Medical Center.

He is also glad that his office is adjacent to the Medical Center so he can respond to emergencies and other duties as needed.

Email Jeff Meyers:jmeyers@pressrepublican.com