Press-Republican

Spectrum

September 30, 2012

The wood that binds

Family enterprise produces custom woodwork, art

AuSABLE FORKS — Lawrence “Larry” Post’s heart was always in the Adirondacks.

His father, Sterling Sr., brought Larry and his brothers, Sterling Jr. and Randy, here to fly fish, mountain climb and camp in the winter. Every weekend and all vacations, the Posts were somewhere in the Adirondacks.

Raised in Latham, Larry longed to move to the “Forever Wild” landscape.

“He pulled up stakes,” said Joann, his wife. “I came up, of course.”

They grew up two miles from each other. They started dating when she was 14, and he was 17.

After graduating from Shaker High School, he became an over-the-road truck driver. Joann majored in nursing at Maria College in Albany.

Larry relocated to the Adirondacks in 1978, and she followed two years later.

Based in Keeseville, Joann joined him on the truck. They saw the country a spell before she began a 22-year nursing career at CVPH Medical Center.

Blessed to their union were two children — Ryan, 28, and Jillian, 24 — both graduates of AuSable Valley Central School.

When he put his 18-wheeler days behind him, Larry worked at Georgia-Pacific, but his avocation was cabinet maker.

No matter what job he held, he was never fulfilled. In his spare time, he made and sold antique reproductions.

Portraiture was Joann’s forte, but she chose a career in nursing for employment stability.

Nine years ago, a twist in their lives changed everything and birthed L. Post Rustics in AuSable Forks.

“Larry had a skiing accident and wound up with a traumatic brain injury,” Joann said. “He had a subdural hematoma and nearly died. He had partial paralysis and extensive memory loss. He would ask the same questions over and over. It was like living with someone with Alzheimer’s. He had debilitating headaches.”

Despite the hand that fate dealt him, Larry was determined to be a productive person. With his memory loss, he had forgotten his artisan skills. He went to his workshop, stood contemplating his tools, knowing he once knew how to use them.

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