Press-Republican

April 10, 2013

Mary Margaret A. Gowdy


Press-Republican

---- — BURLINGTON, VT. — Mary Margaret A. Gowdy died Sunday, April 7, 2013, at Fletcher Allen Hospital, surrounded by her loving family. She was born June 21, 1939, in the Cortland/Groton, N.Y., area. She was the daughter of Evelyn Pankovits Irving and George Finn and the step-daughter of Emmett Irving.

Including these three, she was also predeceased by her paternal grandparents, Mable and Harold Finn of Groton; and maternal grandmother, Ethel Pankovits of Florida; three uncles, Emery Pankovits, Rudy Pankovits and Vincent Pankovits; and two aunts, Fidelma Pankovits and Kathleen Yates.

She is a member of St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church. She was married to George Gowdy in 1959 and lived in North Syracuse before moving to the Elizabethtown area in 1969.

Mary Margaret is survived by a son, Scott T. Gowdy and his wife Wanda; a daughter, Carolyn Gowdy George and her husband Joseph of Amherst, N.H., and five grandsons, Michael and Cody Gowdy, both of Lewis, and Taylor, Jarod and Spencer, all of New Hampshire.

Mary Margaret worked several years at the Groton Bakery for Arnold Heffron. She attended a cosmetology school in Syracuse in 1958. She also worked at the Elizabethtown- Lewis Central School for 30 years, as well as the Essex County Jail as a matron for 12 years. After retiring, she worked at the local "High Peaks" Video Store in Elizabethtown for three years.

Growing up, she spent all her summers on the Owasco Lake in Indian Cove, Moravia, N.Y., at the cottage "Finnland" of grandparents Mable and Harold Finn, affectionately known as Bobo and Gramp. She and her mother also traveled to New York City each year on the Black Diamond Train out of Ithaca to visit family. Never working there herself but many family members worked at the L.C. Smith Corona since it began. That was quite a bit of history, as typewriters and adding machines were the main source of revenue in Groton, Syracuse and eventually opening a plant in Cortland. During WWII, the plant also made ammunition. An uncle, John Coburn, was instrumental in making the first electric typewriter in Syracuse. L.C. Smith Merchant merged with Durkee Spices, but went out of business in the early 1960's.

Calling hours will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 10, at W.M. Marvin's Funeral Home in Elizabethtown. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Thursday, April 11, from St. Elizabeth's Church in Elizabethtown. Burial will be at a later date in St. Elizabeth's Cemetery.

Donations are asked to be made to the Elizabethtown - Lewis Ambulance Service. To offer online condolences, please visit www.wmmarvins.com