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Posted: Monday, November 4, 2013 10:29 am

FRANKLIN COUNTY

COUNTY CLERK

KIP CASSAVAW

Age: 50.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Paul Smith's College.

Occupation: Franklin County Clerk.

Previous government experience: County clerk since April; Deputy county clerk, four years; former supervisor for the Town of Bellmont; former Bellmont Town Council member.

Civic organizations: Past member of Rotary; past president of the New York State Association of Professional Land Surveyors Board of Directors and Northern Association of Professional Land Surveyors. Family: Wife, Joanne; daughter, Taylor.

How has your previous experience readied you for the clerk position, should you retain it?

“I’ve had to spend more time on the big issues, trying to pressure the state into continuing our percentage of DMV money and fighting unfunded mandates.”

He helped implement change to new computer-terminal system that saved $50,000 and said he saved another $50,000 this year through restructuring the office, eliminating a position and adding incentive steps and job-advancement opportunities for DMV staff, which has typically seen a high turnover rate.

“This way, you’re keeping qualified people and allowing the younger people to gain experience to take over those spots."

How would you try to generate more income for the county through the Clerk's Office?

He intends to re-establish the public-information campaign to convince local residents to file registrations and renewals locally, since 12.7 percent of each DMV transaction fee stays in-county.  

“And I’d like to expand (the campaign) on the county website and make it more user friendly. I’m going to push for that starting Jan. 1.”

He would also like to take on more registration filings for New York City residents “that brings in money to us.”

Are there other changes you would want to implement?

He wants to grow use of electronic and digital filing because "it saves paperwork and time instead of processing them through the mail. It’s important for those in Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake who would have to drive here to pick up a copy of a deed.”

The Records Management Office will soon offer online postings that can be easily accessed by genealogists and others. And the state will be initiating e-filing of all court records.

“We’re doing all we can to make records management user friendly.” 

How has the implementation of the Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act (SAFE Act) affected operations?

"It created a lot of work for my office, but we tried to contact the gun owners and pistol-permit holders to make sure they were aware of the changes. We held forums with Sheriff Kevin Mulverhill and told the people just what their responsibilities are.

“And I tried to inform them that it’s not something we’re doing locally. It’s the law. They don’t like the law, but we’re obligated to do our part.” 

CINDY GALE

Age: 55.

Party: Republican.

Education: High-school graduate with honors. Assorted professional courses, certification classes.

Occupation: Payroll clerk, Malone Central School District; per-diem dispatcher, Franklin County Emergency Services.

Previous government experience: Moira town supervisor, six years.

Family: Husband, Kevin; three children, Courtney Weaver, Angela Mackey and Jacob Gale; two grandchildren.

What qualities would you bring to the clerk's position?

“As town supervisor, your commitment is to your community, and that works on the county level as well. You run the government the best that you can in an efficient way and find a workable solution. You work to enhance the town without spending tons of money, which also is the same with county services.

“You have to provide courteous, efficient customer service at the lowest possible cost.”

Gale's experience as a dispatcher prepared her for the clerk position. She became more focused and willing to take on responsibilities while dealing with those at their most vulnerable.

“I have knowledge of the whole county, I’m capable and dedicated, I am a strong leader, and I have a lot of budget experience.

“The best advice I got when I became town supervisor was: ‘In the first year listen. Listen and look at everything. In the second year, implement your ideas. And it worked. It really did.

“I have some areas in the County Clerk’s Office where I have questions, but I want to wait until I get in there to ask them. And if it’s not broke, I’m not going to fix it.”

How would you try to generate more income for the county through the Clerk's Office?

“... I’d like to see if we could be open in a Saturday once a month. I’d also like to see people have more access to (applying for) passports. (Also,) the New York State Police now do the background checks for pistol permits, and the state gets that money. I’d like to see if the Sheriff’s Department and County Clerk’s Office can work together on this and keep the money in the county.”

Are there other programs you would want to implement?

“I’d also like to see about starting an organ-and-tissue donor data base at the county level. You can sign the back of your license and say you’re a donor, but I’d like to see an organ-and-tissue donation sign-up day.

“I’d also like to create veterans’ discount-card program where vets can get a discount on services, like a passport, but I have to do more research. And I’d like to make sure our records are more accessible to the public.”

She favors retaining the satellite motor-vehicle office to serve residents in the Saranac Lake-Tupper Lake region.

The SAFE Act has generated strong feelings — how do you weigh in?

As town supervisor, she initiated a town discussion about the new law. “We took a stand against the SAFE Act. It’s not the guns that kill people. It’s the people who kill people.”

As town supervisor, she initiated a town discussion about the new law.

“We took a stand against the SAFE Act. It’s not the guns that kill people. It’s the people who kill people.”

LEGISLATURE

DISTRICT 3

MARK BESIO

Age: 62.

Party: Republican.

Education: Canton College.

Occupation: Malone Dufort Airport manager; Town of Malone Highway Department clerk.

Civic organizations: St. Augustine’s Church, Bangor.

Family: A daughter, Melissa; a son, John; one grandson.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I’ve worked with budgets for 20 years, and something’s not right here. Apparently, the people doing the budget don’t know much about it, and somehow, the train is off the rails. They need people to go into the budgets and look at them. If I’m elected, I’ll be in it up to my shoulders. And someone has to help the towns. When Studley Hill Road was flooded, the town never got a call from the legislator asking, ‘What can I do to help?’ I’m user friendly.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“I think it will improve property sales around where blight was. You can surely add value and make it look decent, and the whole community will look better.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“Tourism is one of the big issues around here, and that has to be increased somehow. This is a good way to get our debt under control, but we have to see if it will drive people away. Yet with the fiscal stress we’re under, I think it’s a good idea.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“One of my questions would be: Is the county doing everything it can to get grant money? I think a county planner should be a grant writer who will generate enough money to pay for himself as part of the job. I’d stipulate the person would have to write grants.”

GORDON CROSSMAN

Age: 70.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Bachelor’s degree and master’s degree, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired guidance counselor.

Previous government experience: County legislator, six years; Malone Village Board, two years.

Civic organizations: Notre Dame Church; former member of National Ski Patrol; former Boy Scout scout master; Lions Club; Malone Elks; Sons of the American Legion.

Family: Two daughters, Christine and Cathy; five grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I’ve really enjoyed going out and meeting everyone and feeling that I’m doing some good by helping people. I also think it’s important to stay active.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“There are so many derelict buildings, but it’s a good idea to try to fix them up. We need to work on that and get all the help we can get. We’ve got to do something.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“The bed tax would be really good, and it would increase our sales tax. We could take some of the pressure off the people by lowering the property tax. We should keep trying for it.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“We are in tough times, but I do think, ideally, we should have a planner. With the economy, we’re starting to see a light at the end of the tunnel, and I think we’re heading in that direction.”

DISTRICT 4

MARC 'TIM' LASHOMB

Age: 66.

Party: Republican.

Education: LeMoyne College.

Occupation: Owner of Lashomb Insurance Agency.

Previous government experience: County legislator, three years.

Civic organizations: Knights of Columbus; Malone Catholic Parishes; Holy Family School Foundation Board member; Cornell Cooperative Extension director; founder and director of Malone Revitalization Foundation; and many more.

Family: Four children, Jennifer, Mary Katherine, Michael and Dan; five grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“When I was elected in 2010, I felt my almost 40 years of private-sector business experience would allow me to make a significant contribution to helping with county operations and budgeting. The business principles are similar. However, the policy and procedures are vastly different. I have learned much about county operations, and I now have a better understanding of the challenges facing our county. I feel with that experience, I can continue to help address the fiscal and operational challenges that must be resolved if we are going to achieve the efficiencies necessary for responsible and effective county-government operations.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“Tourism is an important economic driver, and dilapidated structures on our main streets and side streets impose a terrible view of what our communities have to offer. We must remove them if we are going to make our communities a destination, not a pass-through. The amount we establish does not come from property taxes but other sources, such as the sale of county-owned property.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“Our economic growth will be determined on how we respond to the challenges of attracting tourists, and we must maximize our use of tourism funds to reach as many potential visitors as possible. I supported an occupancy tax with the understanding these funds will be used for tourism development and not added to our general fund.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“When I took office in 2011, I requested the board allow me to re-apply for a grant to study possibilities of establishing some type of planning concept. We were awarded a grant, and the study is to be completed by the end of the year. It was made clear that no property-tax revenue is to be used for any type of planning concept, and I believe the Franklin County Industrial Development Agency can play a significant role in developing a planning concept. We have missed many grants that would have contributed to economic development.”

CARL SHERWIN

Age: 63.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Medical degree, University of Nevada at Reno.

Occupation: Retired physician; consultant for Alcoa and Franklin County Jail.

Civic organizations: Barnabas House volunteer; Lifeway Community Church Board of Trustees.

Family: Wife, Barbara; two adult children; three grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I feel compelled to get involved. I’ve been hearing it from people that we are absolutely wasting our assets. I expect to work 40 to 50 hours a week, and I do my homework, and I don’t let go when there is a right way to do things.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“If you check with an architect, $35,000 isn’t going to do it. You need to look at the buildings on a case-by-case basis and consider how dangerous it is and if there is historical or architectural value and a way to salvage those.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“One of the things we desperately need to do is increase tourism in the area, so if an occupancy tax works in other places, why not here? I’d expect a tax, and for the county not to be charging it doesn’t make sense.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“Part of the reason we are in the situation we’re in is because we don’t have a plan. The challenge is if you get someone who is not trained in the job, you get a poor plan. But if you want to succeed, you have to hire a professional planner.”

DISTRICT 5

DON DABIEW

Age: 58.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Wayne State University, Michigan.

Occupation: Co-owner of The Olde School in Brushton; retired General Motors employee; former owner of Dabiew’s Market, Bombay.

Previous government experience: Town of Bombay supervisor, three years; Bombay Town Council, five years; director of Town of Bombay Park.

Civic organizations: Franklin County Industrial Development Agency Board of Directors; Franklin County Association of Senior Citizens Board of Directors; president, Covell Bay Housing Office Board of Directors; Fort Covington Adult Center Board of Directors.

Family: Wife, Ann; two children, Christy and Michael; two grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I feel enough is not being done. I am a well-rounded person with business experience and experience as both a town supervisor and a member of the Town Council, and I think I’m well suited to bring that experience up to the county level.

“There should be more communication between the county and the towns. I don’t think that’s happening at all. I think it is good to know what issues there are and see if we can help the towns that way.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“If you don’t make anything look better, how can you ask more from taxpayers? These buildings aren’t safe, and they’re going to fall down. It’s not just a local issue.

“It’s a good idea to put money aside for this because, in the long run, it will get the property back on the tax base. Maybe there are ways to do it cheaper, but if you don’t talk about it, you don’t know.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I don’t know how it could hurt us. Local people aren’t paying for it, and it would be good for the county. The other counties around us are doing it. And tourism is about the only business we have.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“In a way, we need it, and it would be good, but I don’t like the county taking on another department. I’d have to weigh the difference and talk to my five towns and see what they think. If three of the five want it, no matter how I feel personally, I would vote for it.”

SUE ROBIDEAU

Age: 62.

Party: Republican.

Education: High-school diploma.

Occupation: Retired director of financial assistance, Franklin County Department of Social Services.

Previous government experience: County legislator, three years; 30 years in county government.

Civic organizations: Moira Historical Association, Malone Ladies of the Moose and Brushton-Moira American Legion Auxiliary.

Family: Husband, Raymond “Bud” Robideau; a daughter, Melissa; a son, Jeff; stepson, Eric; three grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I feel a major component of being a successful county legislator is the ability to understand a wide variety of issues and work effectively with individuals, businesses, not-for-profit organizations, local government and people of all parties. I truly enjoy being a legislator; it’s a real learning experience. I feel I’ve done a good job representing the people to the best of my ability, and I will continue to do so.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“Every town has them, and I think they need to be cleaned up, but the towns can’t afford it. They need a break at the landfill, but it would still expensive for towns. I hope we can work with every single town to get at least one building down.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I’m definitely in favor of an occupancy tax, and I’m in favor of tourism. I think there is a lot to offer. Who wouldn’t want to come to Franklin County in the fall? The occupancy tax will bring in money to go to promoting tourism.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“I’m not sure. We’re still doing a feasibility study through Cornell Cooperative Extension, but personally, I don’t think Franklin County can afford such a thing. My towns don’t think they need it, but it’s still up in the air until the study’s done.”

DISTRICT 7

EDWIN RANDIG

Age: 50.

Party: Republican.

Education: North Country Community College; SUNY Oswego.  

Occupation: Zoning administrator/code-enforcement officer, Town of Harrietstown.

Family: Wife, Alyssa; three children, Taylor, Kelsey and Dylan.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“My mom served on the School Board for 10 years and was politically motivated and kept up on politics, so that always interested me. I’ve done my job a number of years, I’ve raised my family, but I still feel I have more to give the community.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“These are buildings on the tax rolls that are dilapidated and have code issues. This really should be looked at from a methodical standpoint because it can get costly. (Demolition and removal) costs should go to the property owner on the taxes. Why should it all go on the backs of taxpayers? The owner should be charged for the expenses.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“It’s a good idea. It’s working for Essex County, and it’s from the transient people who are coming to the area for a night or two who are going downtown and using services and walking around, which shows a community is vibrant.

“At the code office, we’re seeing more building permits going out, so there’s an influx of people who will be doing work on their homes. The plumbers, guy at the lumber yard, this is keeping everybody busy. All of that keeps the local economy going.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“I think it’s a good idea as a county to have the ability to plan for county-wide projects as long as it can be paid for.”

CURTIS REYNOLDS

Age: 51.

Party: Independence.

Education: North Country Community College.

Occupation: Retired correction officer.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I want to represent the people of my district and people countywide, and if I’m fortunate enough to be elected, I will do it to the best of my ability. Major issues need to be addressed, and I know it’s going to be an uphill push.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“Auction off the property, and let the bidder pay for the cleanup. The bidder will know that going in, with the understanding you will be responsible for cleaning this up. If the county inherits a property, I’d take it and sell it at auction.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I think, in the southern end of the county, we are fortunate to hopefully have development of 80-plus rooms at the Hotel Saranac. But it’s not fair to that owner that he will have to try to adjust his charge to include a 5 percent bed tax. I attended the hearings in Saranac Lake, and there are people in Paul Maroun’s district who are barely keeping their doors open now. I hope, if it passes, (tourism promotion) will be spread out equally among the townships.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“It’s something that needs more study and something I’d need to get clarification on with the board as a whole.”

BARBARA RICE

Age: 48.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, SUNY Plattsburgh; pre-med, Bennington College; physician’s assistant certification, Albany Medical College.  

Occupation: Co-owner of Rice Furniture with her husband; sister, Sue Rice; and brother-in-law, Clyde Baker.

Previous government experience: Saranac Lake Village Board, two years; Local Development Corporation Board of Directors, 2½ years; Harrietstown Board of Assessment and Review, two years.  

Civic organizations: Habitat for Humanity, Saranac Lake Downtown Committee, Harrietstown Democratic Committee, Saranac Lake Chamber of Commerce and more.

Family: Husband, Chad McCarthy; son, Cal Rice.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“It’s an interesting time to be involved politically. It’s very challenging, but I look at it as an opportunity as well to go and really make a difference and to be part of the solution to some of the issues the county is facing. It’s an opportunity for me to use the knowledge, experience and skills I’ve acquired along the way and apply it to solving county problems.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“This is something that needs to be addressed. Anything we do to improve the appearance in a community and make it more welcoming and a potential spot for a new business to go is important. It is a reasonable use of taxpayer money.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I’m in favor of an occupancy tax. It’s a source of revenue that doesn’t burden local taxpayers. We have to look at new ways to generate revenue. Other places have it, and it is done successfully for tourism and marketing. I’m a big advocate for pursuing it.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“The county is in a tight fiscal position, but you can’t sit on your butt and hope growth comes your way. You have to be proactive, which is a key point to drive local economic development. With employment comes an increase in sales tax and property-tax revenue. But you’ve got to have a plan.”

OTHER RACES

District Attorney: Derek Champagne (R).

County Treasurer: Bryon Varin (D).

County Coroner (vote for two): Martin Hughes II (R); Bert Wilcox (R).

Legislature District 1: Guy "Tim" Smith (D).

Legislature District 2: Billy Jones (D).

Legislature District 6: Paul Maroun (R).

TOWN RACES

BANGOR

Town supervisor: Gary Monica (D, R).

Town clerk: Linda Shova (D, R).

Town Council (vote for two): Tim Tallman (R, Action Party); Gerald Perry (D).

Town Council (two-year unexpired term): Joey St. Mary (D).

Tax collector: Sharon Debyah (D, R).

Highway superintendent: Jamie St. Hilaire (D, R).

BELLMONT

Town Council (vote for two): Greg Langdon (Sunrise Party); Wayne Rogers (R, Sunrise Party).

Highway superintendent: Lee Davis (R, Sunrise Party).

BOMBAY

Town supervisor: Mary Frances Taylor (D).

Town clerk: Jennifer Reardon (D).

Town justice: Terrance Durant (D).

Town Council (vote for two): James Brann (D); Jacque Leduc (D).

Tax collector: Ann Dabiew (D).

Highway superintendent: Jamie Durant (D).

BRANDON

TOWN COUNCIL

(Vote for two):

GARY GONIA

Party: Democrat.

Age: 62.

Education: Brushton-Moira Central School.

Occupation: Truck driver, Harris Oil.

Previous government experience: Town Council member, since 2001.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if 

elected?

"I don't see where we have any, as far as I can see, big issues in the town. So I  guess the only thing I can try to do is try to keep taxes down."

DALE MARSHALL

Party: Republican.

Age: 64.

Education: Malone Central School.

Occupation: Retired, Alcoa fleet maintenance mechanic. 

Military service: National Guard, six years.

Previous government experience: Bangor Grievance Board member, 1988-present.

Civic organizations: Bangor Fire Department, honorary member Family: Wife, Maureen; 4 adult children

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if 

elected?

"I think the biggest issue is if we can keep the taxes down as low as possible. I'm retired so I've got lots of time to devote to the Rec Park for our children, and I'd like to get all the people involved. I like to listen to the people to help make them make our town better."

Ronald Goyea (R) (D), Could not be reached for comment.

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Michael Lawrence (D, R). 

Town clerk: Christine Marshall (R).

Town justice: David Stevens (D); Emily Lawrence (R). 

Tax collector: Mary Gokey (R, D).

Highway superintendent: Gary Marshall (D, R, Voice of the People).

BRIGHTON

TOWN COUNCIL

(Vote for two)

AMBER McKERNAN

Party: Democrat.

Age: 66.

Education: Notre Dame High School; bachelor's degree, D'Youville College. 

Occupation: Retired medical technician.

Previous government experience: Brighton tax collector, 2001 through 2011.

Civic organizations: Lake Placid Curling Club member.

Family: Husband, Thomas; three adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them? 

"Like every other community, we must be mindful of our budget, staying under the 2 percent tax cap as dictated by the state and still being able to provide all of the services that we need to provide for the citizens of our community and generally keeping the town of Brighton a wonderful place to live."

STEVE TUCKER

Party: Democrat, Independent (not sponsored).

Age: 58.

Education: Saranac Lake High School; bachelor's degree, Clarkson University.

Occupation: Co-owner, operator at Tucker Farms.

Previous government experience: Brighton Town Council member, 12 years. 

Civic organizations: Brighton Fire Department volunteer, Knights of Columbus.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"Like everybody else, we've got a state-mandated 2 percent tax cap, and insurance always goes up more than 2 percent. Everything goes up more than 2 percent. We've been able to cut back here and there, so our fund balance isn't in too bad of shape, but we have used some of it. We're still going through the budget process, but we're pretty confident we can keep it under the 2 percent cap."

SARAH KNAPP

Party: Republican.

Age: 30.

Education: Saranac Lake Central School, bachelor's degree, North Country Community College.

Occupation: Adirondack Audiology Associates manager.

Family: Husband, Andrew; two daughters.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"It’s time for some changes to come to the Town of Brighton and to make our residents more aware of what is going on within the town and its officials, and I would hope to bring in a new population of young people and their interests."

OTHER RACES

Highway superintendent: Andy Crary (R, D, C).

Town supervisor: Peter Shrope (D, R, C).

BURKE

TOWN SUPERVISOR

DAVID VINCENT

Party:  Republican. 

Age: 57.

Education: Franklin Academy High School; Ag-Tech School vocational degree, Malone. 

Occupation: Farmer.

Previous government experience: Town supervisor; Town Council, 2000 to 2012.

Civic organizations: Franklin County Farm Service Agency, president; Franklin County Soil and Water, treasurer; former member, Burke Fire Department. 

Family: Wife, Mary, children; four daughters, Pam, Patty, Valerie, Stephanie.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected:

"The biggest issue facing most towns today is the increase in state-mandated programs and no money to back them up. We're constantly facing that challenge.

"Our latest accomplishment is that we have purchased the former U.S. Border Patrol building on Route 11 for our new Town Hall.

"With all these challenges, we are still working on zero to .05 percent raise in taxes. I'm fortunate to have a board that works very well together and is very diligent."

 

ALBERT JOHNSON 

Party: Registered Republican; declined nomination, running on Democrat ticket.

Age: 70.

Education: Franklin Academy, Malone; Humboldt Institute, Minneapolis, Minn.

Occupation: Dairy farmer.

Previous government experience: Town supervisor, 2009 to 2011.

Civic organizations: Franklin County Cooperative Extension; past member, Farm Bureau.

Family: Wife, Shirley; three adult children, Christine, Shawn, Chrystal.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"Property taxes and the New York state tax cap. I feel strongly that we try to stay underneath the cap. Property taxes are becoming unbearable. Town and villages are stressed for money; so are people.

"Taxes were raised 5.2 percent in 2012; I'd like to see our taxes stay under 2 percent. We have to cut expenses to keep under control. Can't spend more than you got. As supervisor, I stayed under the 2 percent."

OTHER RACES

Town clerk: Elizabeth Downing (R); Stassa Neddo (D).

Town Council (vote for two): Timothy Crippen (D, Agriculture); James Otis (R, Agriculture).   

Tax collector: Bertha Leavitt (R).

Highway superintendent: Thomas Russell (R); Bryce LaPlante (D, People’s Choice).

CHATEAUGAY

TOWN COUNCIL

WILLIAM NEMIER

Party: Democrat.

Age: 46.

Education: Chateaugay Central School; one year, Clinton Community College.

Occupation: Correction officer, Bare Hill Correctional Facility.

Family: Wife, Melissa; two children, Harry and Sophia.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"I'd like to see the skate rink go through. I grew up here all my life, and when I was younger, that's what we did. We always had skating. I'd like to see more things for the kids so they don't have to be on the computers all the time.

The proposed closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility is "going to have a major impact. They're all good-paying jobs. I know they're saying they won't be laid off, but they'll have to move around to different areas, and in a little town like this, it will really have a big impact.

"Maybe we can see if there will be other jobs to move into in the area. I don't know what they would do with that building, but maybe try to get somebody to come in there and do something instead of just having it sit around."

FREDRICK COOK

Party: Republican.

Age: 59.

Education: Chateaugay Central School.

Occupation: Retired, New York State Department of Transportation.

Military service: U.S. Air Force.

Previous government experience: Chateaugay Town Council, 1993 to 2013.

Civic organizations: American Legion.

Family: Wife, Lorrie; three adult sons.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected? 

"The biggest thing is that our Town Hall was in bad need of a lot of repairs, and we've been working for the last two or three years quite hard to get these things done. We've made quite a bit of progress, but there's still more to be done, which is why I want to run again.

"We had a big rally (for Chateaugay Correctional Facility). We had over 600 people there. We're not done there; we're going to fight to keep it open. It's going to be an awful detriment to the town and village of Chateaugay if we lose it. I talked with the village mayor the other day, and they think it's going to cost each taxpayer about $135 more."

WILLIAM TROMBLY

Party: Republican.

Age: 48.

Education: Chateaugay Central School; Canton ATC degree; SUNY Oswego degree.

Occupation: Lieutenant, New York State Department of Corrections.

Previous government experience: Village trustee, 1990 to 1995; Village mayor, 1996; Town Council, 1998 to present.

Civic organizations: Chateaugay Volunteer Fire Department, Knights of Columbus.

Family: Wife, Mary Beth; three adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them if elected? 

"With county taxes going up, school taxes going up, I think it's important for us with that extra source of revenue to try to keep taxes down on the town level in order to offset some of the increases at other levels of government.

"Taking away 111 full-time, good-paying jobs (due to the proposed closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility) is not what I call any type of economic stimulus, which is what Gov. Cuomo has indicated he wants to do for the North Country, and it seems to be just the opposite of an attempt like that.

"Of course, we're hoping the governor changes his mind and keeps it a state facility. But if he doesn't, I hope an all-out effort can be made between the state and the Town of Chateaugay and Franklin County to find another use for it which could employ people and keep that economic engine going in this area."

CONSTABLE

Town supervisor: Richard Onufer (D).

Town clerk: Sue Prue (R).

Town Council (vote for two): Melanie Lemire (D); Stanley Tulip (D).

Tax collector: Sheri Eaton (D).

Highway superintendent: Larry Martin (D).

Assessor: Laurie Marshall (D).

DICKINSON

Town supervisor: Sherry Smith (R, Unity).

Town clerk: Tammy Daggett (D, R).

Town Council (vote for two): Robert Clark II (R, Unity); William Greenwood (R).

Tax collector: Kelly Clark (R, D, Unity).

Highway superintendent: Joseph Clookey (R).

DUANE

Town supervisor: Ned Lemieux Sr. (R, D).

Town clerk: Sue Nitto (D, R).

Town Council (vote for two): Rita Gordon (D, R); Mark Young (D, R).

Highway superintendent: Ned Lemieux Jr. (R, D).

Town justice: Jim Lalonde (R, D).

FORT COVINGTON

Town supervisor: Patricia Manchester (D, Unity).

Town clerk: Christine Benway (D); Joni Mitchell Oliver (R).

Town Council (vote for two): Paul Lauzon (D, Unity); David Russell (D).

Tax collector: Karen Stowell (D).

Highway superintendent: Gerard Leroux (R).

Town justice: Christopher Nye (D); Tony Leroux (R).

FRANKLIN

TOWN COUNCIL

TOM BARTISS

Party: Independent; endorsed by Democrat and Republican parties.

Age: 37.

Education: Westhaven High School; associate's and bachelor's degree, Paul Smith's College.

Occupation: Forester/logger.

Civic organizations: Vice president, Loon Lake Homeowners Association.

Family: Wife, Rose; daughter, Emily.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them if elected?

"The biggest issue is always keeping the taxes relative and making proper business decisions. We're just trying to go forward rather than backward, especially with the current economy."

DONALD HAMM

Party: Republican, Independent, Integrity Party.

Age: 68.

Education: Saranac Lake High School.

Occupation: Owner, Whiteface Construction, Don Hamm Farms, Don's Auto and Equipment.

Military service: National Guard Armory, Saranac Lake.

Family: Wife, Doris; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"We're actually a bedroom community. The majority of the people are retired here. There's no industry here in the Town of Franklin to amount to anything. Very few businesses. We own a lot of land. The state owns the majority of it. With the state mandates and the acquisitions, our town has got to run super efficient in order to keep the taxes in check so the original residents or people who aren't wealthy can afford to live here."

MARY ELLEN KEITH

Party: Democrat, running independent.

Age: 84.

Education: Saranac Lake High School; associate degree,North Country Community College.

Occupation: Retired, licensed practical nurse.

Previous government experience: Franklin town supervisor, 1980 to 1992 and 2003 to 2009.

Civic organizations: St. Paul's Food Pantry coordinator, Town of Franklin 55-Plus Club, vice president, St. Paul's Church organist.

Family: Widow; nine children, seven foster children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"I will certainly scrutinize the bills. I've read all the statements, their monthly statements, and I know what's going on.

"We have a wonderful summer program at the playground (but) our youngsters have no place for a toilet; they have one portable potty and no place to wash their hands. ... I'm going to work to make sure we get something up at that park for the community and for our kids. ... It's a wonderfully run program, but it has no priority in this town board of getting something up there or doing anything creative to get something up there."

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Arthur Willman Jr. (R, Integrity).

Town clerk: Lauren Lefebvre (D, R, Integrity).

Highway superintendent: Jacques Demars (R, Integrity). 

Town justice: Roger Symonds (D).

HARRIETSTOWN 

TOWN COUNCIL

(Four-year term)

EDWARD J. GOETZ JR.

Party: Democrat, Independent.

Age: 63.

Education: Bachelor's degree, SUNY Brockport.

Occupation: Retired, New York State Department of Corrections.

Previous government experience: Saranac Lake Central School Board, six years.

Civic organizations: Saranac Lake Pee Wee Hockey; former president and secretary/treasurer, Saranac Lake Youth Baseball/Softball Association; high-school basketball and football official; former collegiate women’s basketball official; ECAC Division 1 AA, collegiate football official.

Family: Wife, Susan; two sons, Brian and Steven; four grandchildren.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“Hopefully, if I am elected, we can maintain budget expenditure at or below the tax cap. I would also hope to examine the operations and cost of managing the Adirondack Regional Airport. That seems to be a very big bone of contention within the town. It is a major expense within the budget, balanced solely on the backs of Harrietstown taxpayers. I think that financial support for airport operations should be more diverse within the surrounding townships.

"The town is coming through a tumultuous time with its past supervisor, one in which I don’t think the taxpayers think they were being heard. Hopefully, I can give them a voice."

RONALD B. KEOUGH

Party: Republican, Conservative.

Age: 77.

Education: Saranac Lake High School, St. Michael’s College, Simmons Mortuary School.

Occupation: Owner, Fortune-Keough Funeral Home.

Previous government experience: Harrietstown Town Council, 30-plus years; former deputy town supervisor, four years; former Harrietstown town supervisor, 10 years; served on Building and Grounds Committee; founding member, Dewey Mountain organizational committee; Harrietstown Business Park Committee; community government representative for Town Council; former member, Fire Advisory Board.

Civic organizations: Saranac Lake Winter Carnival Committee; Rotary Club of Saranac Lake, board member and past president; Saranac Lake Elks Lodge; Knights of Columbus; former coach, Little League Baseball and Pee Wee Hockey; former and organizing member, Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department, 10 years active duty.

Family: Wife, Margaret; five sons, Mike, Pat, Tim, Brendan and Bryan; 14 grandchildren.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I want to continue to work to complete repairs on the Town Hall and the retaining wall along the river that was damaged in flooding in 2011. Also I would address structural issues at the Town Hall, which are on the exterior and interior of the building.

"If re-elected, I want to continue to work on renovations at Dewey Mountain, working with the volunteers to fund the building of the new lodge.

"In addition, I want to continue to work on the Harrietstown Business Park and move forward with a realistic plan for continued development of the facility, increased opportunity for employment and an increased tax base.

"The other piece is to continue to work with the Town Council, the Chamber and the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism on marketing plans for economic development of the area, making the Harrietstown Town Hall, Dewey Mountain, the Adirondack Regional Airport and the Harrietstown Business Park points of destination.

"I would like to continue in my community to work with others to achieve prudent, positive and effective use of taxpayer dollars and community services." 

PATRICIA MEAGHER

Party: Republican, Conservative.

Age: 62.

Education: St. Pius X High School; SUNY Cobleskill; associate's degree, North Country Community College.

Occupation: Retired, deputy town clerk, court clerk and deputy tax collector, Town of Harrietstown.

Family: Husband, Richard; two daughters, Jennifer and Amy; two grandsons.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I hope to give back to the taxpayers. I’ve been paid by the residents of Harrietstown for 12 years and would look to spend the taxpayer dollars in the most efficient way, while completing the issues critical to the town.

"Right now, we have several structural and repair issues with the Town Hall that need to be completed. Urgently we need to fix the retaining wall along the Saranac River.

"There are ongoing fiscal and renovation issues at the airport.

"I am concerned about the taxpayer dollar being spent wisely."

TOWN COUNCIL 

(Two-year term)

GERALD GILLMETT

Party: Independence Party; running on Republican and Conservative lines.

Age: 69.

Education: St. Pius X High School; Paul Smith’s College.

Occupation: Retired, self-employed electrical contractor.

Previous government experience: Former Franklin County legislator, 11 years.

Civic organizations: Past member and previous president, Saranac Lake Lions Club; Saranac Lake Moose Club; member and past president, Lake Clear Association; member and past president, Saranac Lake Mountaineers Rugby Club; former member Franklin County 4-H Camp Committee; member, past president Franklin Snowmobilers Inc.; member and past president Tri-Lakes Snowmobile Club; former Catholic Youth Organization leader; former 4-H Club leader; Little League coach; past president, St. John’s Parish Council; volunteer, Boilermaker 15K Road Race in Utica.

Family: Three daughters, Tammie, Yvette, Christine.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“Recalling my experience as legislator, I hope to keep taxes under control. During my tenure as chairman of the Franklin County Board of Legislators, taxes went down close to 5 percent. I would work to achieve the same in the town government.

"Also, I think it’s important that I am the only chairman of the board of legislators to appoint a vice chairman of the opposite party. I would hope to achieve bipartisan cooperation on the Town Council.

"While I was a legislator, I was chairman of the Franklin County Highway Committee and remain an honorary member. With that experience, I can help the town in any aspect of highway services coordination. I also was instrumental as legislator not only in maintaining DMV office in Saranac Lake but also in increasing services there to five days a week. The DMV operation is a very important aspect of county services in Saranac Lake, and I would work to maintain that location and hours.

"I would also like to see if I could get more cooperation between the towns, county and municipalities that use the Adirondack Regional Airport. With my experience and background, I could sit down with representatives of the surrounding towns and achieve that cooperation."

HOWARD J. RILEY

Party: Democratic, Unity.

Age: 83.

Education: Saranac Lake High School.

Occupation: Retired newpaperman; historian; author; manager, Lake Placid Club.

Previous government experience: Former Saranac Lake mayor; former trustee, Saranac Lake Village Board; four years, Harrietstown Town Council; six years, Harrietstown town justice.

Civic organizations: Former member, Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce; former member Adirondack Scenic Railroad Board of Directors; former member Adirondack Medical Center Board; Lake Placid Skating Club; member, Hall of Fame Selection Committee.

Military service: U.S. Army National Guard, nine years.

Family: Six children, Keefe, Kurt, Keegan, Kasey, Kean, Kelby.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I want to help the Chamber of Commerce market the Town Hall. It’s the nicest building we have downtown and needs more use.

"The other concern is the Adirondack Regional Airport in Lake Clear. Not any criticism to anyone who has run or is running it, but I would work to help oversee the upcoming renovations, which are badly needed.

"I also think I really can help with the merging of the town and village court system, a process that is starting in April 2014. I think I will be able to help the new town justice because I can certainly tell him what not to do.

"This is a two-year term, and that’s perfect for me. My mission is to cooperate with the board and do what is best for the taxpayers of Harrietstown."

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Robert Bevilacqua (R, C).

Town clerk: Patricia Gillmett (R, C).

Highway superintendent: Craig Donaldson (R, C).

MALONE 

TOWN COUNCIL

HENRY GONYEA

Age: 76.

Party: Republican.

Education: High-school.

Occupation: Retired equipment manager, State Department of Transportation; co-owner of J. Gonyea Enterprises.

Civic organizations: Malone Elks Lodge; Notre Dame Church.

Military: U.S. Marine Corps, retired as a corporal.

Family: Wife, Judith; four children; 16 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

“I’ve lived here all my life. I believe that we need some changes, and that’s not happening. We need industry in this town because taxpayers are beaten to death with taxes. There isn’t very much being done to solve the problem. If I’m elected, I’ll do the best I can for the Town of Malone people.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“Our biggest issue is to get industry in here, but I haven’t come up with any (ideas) yet. I’d like to see us blacktop roads instead of grading them because when you grade a road, it washes away and you have to do it over again.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District?

“In my mind, no. When you start sharing services between three different departments that are all different — the village, the town and the school — there is going to be conflict. The village and the town could do it together, but not with the school and a bus garage.”

MARY SCHARF

Age: 62.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, master’s degrees, St. Lawrence University.

Occupation: Retired Spanish teacher.

Previous government experience: Town Council, four years.

Civic organizations: Greater Malone Chamber of Commerce; Foothills Arts Society; Franklin County and Town of Malone Democratic Party Committee.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

"It was a hard decision. But I’m still young and energetic and feel I’ve contributed. I believe in a better economy, better education and a better environment. Voters feel like they have no control. It’s frustrating. Citizens do not know what government is doing nor do they understand why we do things. This is due to a lack of educating on the part of elected officials and should be considered a requirement all elected officials.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“I think tourism is our future because we’re not going to get an IBM. Our major asset is our beauty.

"We need more shared services. The code offices should be combined, and Highway and Public Works. They are already doing projects together, but I think we can save more money in that area.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District? 

“I think it’s a good idea and a way to lower our expenses, but whether the FAA is going to allow it could be a problem. This is a shared service, and it would save both entities money because 90 percent of it is funding with state aid.”

PATRICK SHERWIN

Age: 66.

Party: Conservative, Republican.

Education: High-school and some college classes.

Occupation: Retired farmer and heavy-equipment operator/contractor.

Previous government experience: Former Town of Brandon supervisor; former Brandon Town Council member.

Civic organizations: Knights of Columbus; St. Joseph’s Church.

Family: Six adult children; two foster sons.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

“I enjoyed it when I was in the Town of Brandon, but I really did it to help myself and other taxpayers with their taxes. This 2 percent tax cap is something that really has to be done because people just can’t afford it.

"There were 14 of us growing up, and I am well experienced in how to pinch a dollar. I have nothing to gain from this personally. It’s just for the people, and anyone can feel free to contact me for any reason.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“I think combined services are the big thing. I don’t think shared services are the best idea. It might work for buying purposes, but I don’t think the rest of it would work.

"There is talk about solar power, and I think it’s probably a good idea. Sometimes you’ve got to spend money to save money, but I’d like to hear more about it before we go diving in.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District?

“No. They are two different entities all together. Shared services might work with the school and village, but if it’s a shared salt barn, say, who loads the vehicles and how do you keep it separate? And there are too many ifs and buts, and I don’t think it will save the taxpayers anything.”

JACK SULLIVAN

Age: 71.

Party: Democrat.

Education: SUNY Plattsburgh; Cornell University.

Occupation: Retired physical-science and physics teacher; retired auctioneer.

Previous government experience: Eight years, Malone Town Council.

Civic organizations: Habitat for Humanity, Kiwanis Club, Malone Fish and Game Club, Malone Elks.

Family: Wife, Barbara; five children; 10 grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

“I really enjoy it, and there are a lot of things I want to continue on, like solar energy at the town buildings, which looks quite promising, and working on a comprehensive plan for the town and reworking our zoning regulations so they fit in the with the village’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Project.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“Shared services are certainly still alive. The town is strapped for money, but I would hope we could continue improving roads. The only practical solution would be making small repairs over time because it’s not only the paving, it’s the wetlands and brooks and culverts that have to be replaced.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District?

"The plan’s been changed a couple of times, and it looks promising, but it will be an uphill battle with the FAA. I’d like to see it happen.”

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Howard Maneely (D, R, C).

Highway superintendent: Thomas Shanty (R).

MOIRA

SUPERVISOR

JAMES BEGOR

Party: Democrat.

Age: 56.

Education: Dover Junior-Senior High School, Dover Plains. 

Occupation: Retired manager at State Department Environmental Conservation maintenance center; Malone Central School District bus driver.

Previous government experience: Town of Moira code enforcement officer, three years; Democratic Party Committee, Town of Moira. 

Family: Lynne Santor.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected:

"There needs to be more oversight of people who are working for our town." 

BURTON PECK IV

Party: Republican.

Age: 49.

Education: Brushton-Moira Central School; associate's degree, Paul Smith's College; bachelor's degree and master's degree, SUNY Potsdam; master's degree, Vermont Law School; master's degree, St. Lawrence University. 

Occupation: Business and English teacher, Massena High School.

Previous government experience: Moira Republican Committee.

Civic organizations: Little League baseball coach, Massena Federation of Teachers Union, vice president.  

Family: Wife, Kimberly.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"To keep costs down and still maintain a good level of services. This is a daunting task because there are a lot of mandates by the state, and the financial components are challenging. I would have to sit and see where we are at to figure out ways to save money, look at grants that could help, any kind of opportunity to save money, like shared services to provide services but not cost somebody a job. I'm of the belief it's about serving the community."

TOWN COUNCIL

MARTY BURNETT

Party: Democrat.

Age: 55.

Education: Brushton-Moira Central School.

Occupation: Retired, head custodian at Brushton-Moira Central School.

Previous government experience: Moira Town Council, 20 years.

Civic organizations: Deputy Franklin County fire coordinator; Brushton-Moira Volunteer Fire Department and EMS.

Family: Wife, Connie; two sons.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"The biggest one is the lack of money to try to cover all your requirements. Everybody is doing more with less. It's very challenging with rises in benefits and insurances and all the other little fuel and heating costs. And with a 2 percent cap, it makes it a tremendous challenge to balance all of that. I'd like to think I'd be a contributing factor. Obviously, I'd like to thank the public for supporting me for the last 20 years, but hopefully they have confidence in the decisions I'm making."

DARRIN JOCK

Party: Republican.

Age: 43.

Education: Franklin Academy.

Occupation: Shared transportation supervisor, Brushton-Moira Central School, St. Regis Central School.

Civic organizations: New York Association of Pupil Transportation.

Family: Wife, Teresa, three children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"The biggest issue I'd say, and it rings through in every community, is taxes. I've been a resident for 20 years of this area, and I'm hoping that we can look and find ways to keep taxes down and still give the community everything that's needed to be a strong, safe and clean environment."

TIMOTHY TRIMM

Party: Republican.

Age: 53.

Education: Bruston-Moira Central School; college courses, Cornell University.

Occupation: New York state correction officer.

Civic organizations: Fire chief, Moira Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department.

Family: Wife, Susan; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"The biggest issue with all communities is probably their taxes, and I'm just going to try to keep taxes at bay."

OTHER RACES

Town clerk: Kathleen Laramay (R).

Tax collector: Rita White (R).

Highway superintendent: James Helm (D, R). 

Town justice: James Durant (D).

SANTA CLARA

Town supervisor: Marcel “Mickey” Webb (R).

Town clerk/tax collector: Laurie McGill (R).

Town Council (vote for two): Philip Durkin (R); David Perry (R).

Highway superintendent: Andrew McGill (R).

TOWN OF TUPPER LAKE 

SUPERVISOR

ROGER AMELL

Party: Democrat.

Age: 56.

Education: Tupper Lake High School.

Occupation: Owner, Amell Logging Inc.

Previous government experience: Town supervisor, eight years.

Civic organizations: Tupper Lake Rotary Club, Tupper Lake Snowmobile Club, Tupper Lake Rod & Gun Club, ARISE volunteer, Big Tupper Ski Area volunteer, Track & Field construction project member, Multi-Use Trail Committee.

Family: Wife, Mary Kay; three children, Jason, Kayla, Troy.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“I would hope to see the mountain project and development get off the ground. The Adirondack Club and Resort has been through eight years of review and mediation, and I’ve been involved heavily in the process. 

"I know what we have had to do to get to this point. I would continue to advocate and work in local planning to see the project continues moving in the right direction. We also have a plan for new projects at the Tupper Lake Country Club — we are looking to winterize part of the building to add revenue, and that is something I would like to see through to completion. 

"There are other projects to draw tourism and improve town facilities. I also would like to move ahead with upgrades at our beachfront facility at Little Wolf. The town is going to be purchasing a new snowmobile trail groomer, and we are expanding, grooming trails within Franklin County that connect to trails in St. Lawrence County. 

"There is a plan for a new trail system along Route 3 into Piercefield that connects to Conifer and Cranberry Lake. Snowmobile traffic in winter is very important for local business. It does mean a lot for Tupper Lake — snowmobilers bring fresh revenue when things are slow, which is good for the restaurants and local businesses, the gas stations and machine repair shops. 

"In my last eight years as town supervisor, the taxpayers came first. And everybody’s a taxpayer. I’ve done my best to keep taxes low, and we’ve never overridden the tax cap, and we did it all without going without. We have been fortunate to have a little bit of growth every year. The added assessed value does help with increased revenue."

PATRICIA S. LITTLEFIELD

Party: Republican, Independence, Conservative, Independent, Bright Future.

Age: 56.

Education: Tupper Lake High School; Ogdensburg Business School.

Occupation: Corporate compliance officer, North Country Home Services; former compliance officer and administrator, Adirondack ARC.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake Town Council; former member, Town of Tupper Lake Board of Assessment Review, four years; former member, Zoning Board of Appeals, four years.

Civic organizations: Foster Grandparent Advisory Board; former manager, Skating Club of Tupper Lake, 11 years, past member Holy Ghost Academy School Board, St. Alphonsus Church Parish Council. 

Family: Husband, Kevin; son, Owen and daughter, Hannah.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“I would like to have the opportunity to continue to work for the people of Tupper Lake as town supervisor. I have followed local government all my life, since my father was a village trustee, mayor and then county legislator. Monitoring tax rates is something I consider a high priority, especially when it concerns seniors or those on fixed incomes trying to maintain their livelihoods, as well as the young people who are making Tupper Lake their home. 

"I hope to achieve and create opportunities for our young people so they can return home and prosper here. It is very exciting to see how so many young people are now working toward home-ownership here. 

"We need to keep up the great efforts to promote Tupper Lake and work with local groups to develop a consistent brand for Tupper Lake for tourism. Recreation is key to moving Tupper Lake ahead and offers an enticement to anyone wanting to relocate here. The Wild Walk will bring a tremendous amount of attention to Tupper Lake, which will enhance an already impressive site. 

"Little Wolf Beach and campground is a great investment in promoting Tupper Lake and should be improved upon each year. The municipal golf course is a wonderful asset and also provides an exceptional cross-country ski area. 

"I acknowledge all the hard work and efforts put forth by the Adirondack Scenic Railroad and the Next Stop Tupper Lake teams. However, after many years of debate, reading loads of commentary, opinions, statistics and talking with parties from both sides and reviewing the Unit Management Plan for the corridor which runs through Tupper Lake, I believe it is time that we encourage the state to revert back to the item in the plan which allows for removal of the tracks and open the travel corridor up for tourism via hikers, bikers, walkers, and especially snowmobilers. 

"Tupper Lake is missing out on a huge part of winter tourism by not having easy access to get here. And bikers are travelling all over the Northeast to ride corridors. We need to reach out to and welcome those groups to our area in all aspects, and, in the end, we will begin to grow again. Tupper Lake is a great place to live, work and raise a family. I would hope to be part of the team that leads our town forward to achieve long-term economic stability and growth.”

TOWN COUNCIL 

(Vote for two, four-year term)

MICHAEL DECHENE

Party: Republican.

Age: 55.

Education: Tupper Lake High School.

Occupation: Landscaping business owner; retired from Federal Bureau of Prisons; former Town Highway Department employee.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake School District Board of Education, 11 years, six as president.

Civic organizations: Tupper Lake Country Club Board of Directors; Tupper Lake Lions Club; Tupper Lake Football Boosters; past member, St. Alphonsus Parish Council.

Family: Wife, Diane; two sons, Evan and Matthew.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“My platform is to work promoting Tupper Lake and the things we have here in our community. We have beautiful lakes and streams and hiking, cross-country skiing and a beautiful golf course. I want to promote Tupper Lake by marketing what we have here.

"I do support the Adirondack Club and Resort development, and I also support all economic development in our community.

"I would like to work together with the Town Council and Village Board of Trustees to promote the good things of Tupper Lake. Born and raised here all my life, I love Tupper Lake. It’s my home, and I am very passionate about it."

DON DEW JR.

Party: Republican, Conservative.

Age: 52.

Education: Bachelor's degree, Norwich University.

Occupation: Owner, Timber Lodge.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake Joint Planning Board, three years.

Civic organizations: Past president and board member Tupper Lake Chamber of Commerce; Tupper Lake Revitalization Committee; ARISE; volunteer administrative manager, Big Tupper Ski Area.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"First of all, as a community, we’re on the verge of so many great things and, now, it’s a matter of pushing them over the brink. Though tied in litigation, we have to continue to do what we can do as a community to support the Adirondack Club and Resort. I would continue to make sure we get to a point where we can put shovels in the ground.

"But resort development is certainly not all that we have. Other projects I hope to accomplish include developing a destination marketing plan for Tupper Lake, a document that we can use for outside investors as well as for tourism. I think we could have a component of a marketing plan that can be used to attract investors to Tupper Lake.

"A couple projects that I would like to see move forward include: a reuse plan for the Oval Wood Dish factory. I think we could get a lot more aggressive with a plan for that site. And we do have the Tupper Lake Industrial Park in place and shovel-ready. I’m not sure we are locally doing enough to promote that. These projects would be something to accomplish in concert with the Franklin County Industrial Development Agency. It’s about aggressive marketing — going after investment and getting these facilities occupied. Filling both would broaden the tax base and create jobs.

"I think the biggest thing in the next term is obviously taxes. Our current board has done a fairly decent job of maintaining taxes. We’ve had a recent revaluation; I’m thinking we could have been able to show some decrease in tax rates. I think we can possibly do a little bit better.

"The current board is looking at the sale of Setting Pole Dam, and I would support that transaction. We’ve got to make sure there is plan to maintain some control in keeping the water levels managed correctly.

"The other goal is in keeping revitalization moving forward: Revitalization on our waterfront has evolved through Little Loggers Playground, which today is under construction, and that means jobs. People here are working in Tupper Lake, and we’re right on the edge of creating a lot more of them."

JOHN L. QUINN

Party: Democrat; Independent, Maple Leaf.

Age: 58.

Education: Tupper Lake High School; associate degree, Paul Smith's College; bachelor's degree, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired from Adirondack Park Agency, 30 years as environmental programs specialist.

Previous government experience: Appointed to interim term, Tupper Lake Town Council; served two terms on Tupper Lake Central School District School Board.

Civic organizations: Previous member of Tupper Lake Rescue Squad, 20 years; Tupper Lake Lions Club; Tupper Lake Rod and Gun Club; volunteer, trail maintenance and grooming at Tupper Lake Cross-County Ski Center.

Family: Wife, Rita; daughter, Leah; son, Brendan.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I am now appointed to the council, filling an unexpired term. I would like to see the Town of Tupper Lake get more involved in promoting itself as a good place to live and work, encouraging new residents and businesses to locate in Tupper Lake while finding ways to keep our young people here by creating jobs.

"I would be remiss by not stating publicly that I stand for keeping taxes as low as possible and getting the most bang for our buck.

"I would also hope the Town Council would work closely with state elected officials to ensure Sunmount’s continued operation and maybe even expansion into providing different services. I think the town and village of Tupper Lake need to collaborate a bit more and create a promotion to draw people here. There are lots of places around Tupper Lake to create a hiking and paddling challenge unique to our community. Also, going forward, I do support the conversion of the railroad line to a recreational trail. I think its time has come, and we need to get behind that prospect of providing a multi-use trail in Tupper Lake."

SABRINA SABRE SHIPMAN

Party: Democrat.

Age: 37.

Education: Tupper Lake High School; courses at North Country Community College; former licensed real estate agent.

Occupation: Information technology specialist for New York state.

Previous government experience: Clerk, Tupper Lake Planning Board, two years.

Civic organizations: Former chair, Relay for Life in Tupper Lake; volunteer, Tupperpalooza; volunteer, Tupper Lake Tin Man.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I have a lot of concerns with job loss potential at Sunmount due to state agency restructuring. My experience at Sunmount will be pro-active in supporting jobs at Sunmount.

"I would like to be more involved in the town's budget-planning process and in increasing the transparency of our town government."

TOWN COUNCIL

(Two-year seat)

KATHLEEN LEVEBVRE

Party: Democrat.

Age: 64.

Education: Bachelor's degree, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired, elementary school teacher.

Previous government experience: Town Council, eight years; deputy supervisor, two years; former trustee, North Country Community College, nine years.

Civic organizations: Tupper Lake Rotary Club, Tupper Lake Ecumenical Choir, Adirondack Public Observatory Education Committee.

Family: Husband, Dean; two sons, Dan and Paul.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“I have closely followed the Adirondack Club and Resort Project for the last nine years and would like to be in office to see it finally begin.

"I also would like to continue to work to retain jobs at Sunmount DDSO and to possibly bring new jobs to our community.

"Tourism is a part of Tupper Lake’s economy, and I would like to work to make it even a bigger part by developing more snowmobile trails and cross-country ski trails for winter activities. That is why, in the 2014 town budget, I supported the purchase of a trail groomer for snowmobiling and the purchase of a mower to maintain the cross-country ski trails during the off season.

"I also support the railroad along with trails and will work to help provide more hiking and biking trails throughout the beautiful woodlands surrounding Tupper Lake.

"Finally, I hope to be able to continue to keep property-tax increases at a minimum as we’ve done again this year, with only a 3 cents per $1,000 overall tax increase, which translates to just a $3 total tax increase on a $100,000 home."

ERIC SHAHEEN

Party: Republican; Conservative.

Age: 45.

Education: Tupper Lake High School.

Occupation: Self-employed, general contractor.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake Country Club Board, former president; Tupper Lake Planning Board.

Family: Wife, Briggette; sons, Lucas and Mason.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"One of my biggest reasons for running is trying to change things here in Tupper Lake, try to get more business, more tourism, more economic development.

"I've lived here my whole life, and it just seems like we're going backwards. I'd like to see the town and village work together a little more closely to try to promote tourism here."

WAVERLY

TOWN COUNCIL

LAWRENCE CHENEY

Party: Democrat.

Age: 67.

Education: St. Regis Falls Central School.

Occupation: Retired line handler, St. Lawrence Seaway.

Military service: U.S. Army. 

Civic organizations: American Legion, Meals on Wheels.

Family: Wife, Sydna; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"One of our biggest problems is the amount of years that (derelict) buildings are going for back taxes. St. Lawrence County, every year they have (a tax auction) for the previous two years. Franklin County has historically been five, six, even as high as seven years. 

"When you go that long, the buildings are abandoned, and once a building is abandoned, it just becomes more run down. We have to try to get the (back taxes), and this is nothing I can accomplish as a board member, other than trying to have the town put a little more pressure on the county to try and hold a tax sale every year for the previous two years."

ERNEST WITKOWSKI

Party: Democrat, Unity.

Age: 65.

Education: Linton High School; bachelor's degree, master's degree and certificate of advanced study in administration, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired, grade-school administrator.

Previous government experience: Town Council member since 2008.

Civic organizations: Association of Senior Citizens Board of Directors, St. Regis Falls Adult Center Board of Directors, vice president.

Family: Wife, Rebecca; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them?

"We want to provide the basic services that our citizens need but also contain taxes. That's certainly one of our goals."

Howard "Butch" Goodrow: Did not return messages asking for information for this report.

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Michael Bailey (R, Shamrock).

Town clerk: Deborah Fraser (R, We The People).

Tax collector: Amy White (R). 

HigFRANKLIN COUNTY

COUNTY CLERK

KIP CASSAVAW

Age: 50.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Paul Smith's College.

Occupation: Franklin County Clerk.

Previous government experience: County clerk since April; Deputy county clerk, four years; former supervisor for the Town of Bellmont; former Bellmont Town Council member.

Civic organizations: Past member of Rotary; past president of the New York State Association of Professional Land Surveyors Board of Directors and Northern Association of Professional Land Surveyors. Family: Wife, Joanne; daughter, Taylor.

How has your previous experience readied you for the clerk position, should you retain it?

“I’ve had to spend more time on the big issues, trying to pressure the state into continuing our percentage of DMV money and fighting unfunded mandates.”

He helped implement change to new computer-terminal system that saved $50,000 and said he saved another $50,000 this year through restructuring the office, eliminating a position and adding incentive steps and job-advancement opportunities for DMV staff, which has typically seen a high turnover rate.

“This way, you’re keeping qualified people and allowing the younger people to gain experience to take over those spots."

How would you try to generate more income for the county through the Clerk's Office?

He intends to re-establish the public-information campaign to convince local residents to file registrations and renewals locally, since 12.7 percent of each DMV transaction fee stays in-county.  

“And I’d like to expand (the campaign) on the county website and make it more user friendly. I’m going to push for that starting Jan. 1.”

He would also like to take on more registration filings for New York City residents “that brings in money to us.”

Are there other changes you would want to implement?

He wants to grow use of electronic and digital filing because "it saves paperwork and time instead of processing them through the mail. It’s important for those in Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake who would have to drive here to pick up a copy of a deed.”

The Records Management Office will soon offer online postings that can be easily accessed by genealogists and others. And the state will be initiating e-filing of all court records.

“We’re doing all we can to make records management user friendly.” 

How has the implementation of the Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act (SAFE Act) affected operations?

"It created a lot of work for my office, but we tried to contact the gun owners and pistol-permit holders to make sure they were aware of the changes. We held forums with Sheriff Kevin Mulverhill and told the people just what their responsibilities are.

“And I tried to inform them that it’s not something we’re doing locally. It’s the law. They don’t like the law, but we’re obligated to do our part.” 

CINDY GALE

Age: 55.

Party: Republican.

Education: High-school graduate with honors. Assorted professional courses, certification classes.

Occupation: Payroll clerk, Malone Central School District; per-diem dispatcher, Franklin County Emergency Services.

Previous government experience: Moira town supervisor, six years.

Family: Husband, Kevin; three children, Courtney Weaver, Angela Mackey and Jacob Gale; two grandchildren.

What qualities would you bring to the clerk's position?

“As town supervisor, your commitment is to your community, and that works on the county level as well. You run the government the best that you can in an efficient way and find a workable solution. You work to enhance the town without spending tons of money, which also is the same with county services.

“You have to provide courteous, efficient customer service at the lowest possible cost.”

Gale's experience as a dispatcher prepared her for the clerk position. She became more focused and willing to take on responsibilities while dealing with those at their most vulnerable.

“I have knowledge of the whole county, I’m capable and dedicated, I am a strong leader, and I have a lot of budget experience.

“The best advice I got when I became town supervisor was: ‘In the first year listen. Listen and look at everything. In the second year, implement your ideas. And it worked. It really did.

“I have some areas in the County Clerk’s Office where I have questions, but I want to wait until I get in there to ask them. And if it’s not broke, I’m not going to fix it.”

How would you try to generate more income for the county through the Clerk's Office?

“... I’d like to see if we could be open in a Saturday once a month. I’d also like to see people have more access to (applying for) passports. (Also,) the New York State Police now do the background checks for pistol permits, and the state gets that money. I’d like to see if the Sheriff’s Department and County Clerk’s Office can work together on this and keep the money in the county.”

Are there other programs you would want to implement?

“I’d also like to see about starting an organ-and-tissue donor data base at the county level. You can sign the back of your license and say you’re a donor, but I’d like to see an organ-and-tissue donation sign-up day.

“I’d also like to create veterans’ discount-card program where vets can get a discount on services, like a passport, but I have to do more research. And I’d like to make sure our records are more accessible to the public.”

She favors retaining the satellite motor-vehicle office to serve residents in the Saranac Lake-Tupper Lake region.

The SAFE Act has generated strong feelings — how do you weigh in?

As town supervisor, she initiated a town discussion about the new law. “We took a stand against the SAFE Act. It’s not the guns that kill people. It’s the people who kill people.”

As town supervisor, she initiated a town discussion about the new law.

“We took a stand against the SAFE Act. It’s not the guns that kill people. It’s the people who kill people.”

LEGISLATURE

DISTRICT 3

MARK BESIO

Age: 62.

Party: Republican.

Education: Canton College.

Occupation: Malone Dufort Airport manager; Town of Malone Highway Department clerk.

Civic organizations: St. Augustine’s Church, Bangor.

Family: A daughter, Melissa; a son, John; one grandson.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I’ve worked with budgets for 20 years, and something’s not right here. Apparently, the people doing the budget don’t know much about it, and somehow, the train is off the rails. They need people to go into the budgets and look at them. If I’m elected, I’ll be in it up to my shoulders. And someone has to help the towns. When Studley Hill Road was flooded, the town never got a call from the legislator asking, ‘What can I do to help?’ I’m user friendly.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“I think it will improve property sales around where blight was. You can surely add value and make it look decent, and the whole community will look better.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“Tourism is one of the big issues around here, and that has to be increased somehow. This is a good way to get our debt under control, but we have to see if it will drive people away. Yet with the fiscal stress we’re under, I think it’s a good idea.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“One of my questions would be: Is the county doing everything it can to get grant money? I think a county planner should be a grant writer who will generate enough money to pay for himself as part of the job. I’d stipulate the person would have to write grants.”

GORDON CROSSMAN

Age: 70.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Bachelor’s degree and master’s degree, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired guidance counselor.

Previous government experience: County legislator, six years; Malone Village Board, two years.

Civic organizations: Notre Dame Church; former member of National Ski Patrol; former Boy Scout scout master; Lions Club; Malone Elks; Sons of the American Legion.

Family: Two daughters, Christine and Cathy; five grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I’ve really enjoyed going out and meeting everyone and feeling that I’m doing some good by helping people. I also think it’s important to stay active.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“There are so many derelict buildings, but it’s a good idea to try to fix them up. We need to work on that and get all the help we can get. We’ve got to do something.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“The bed tax would be really good, and it would increase our sales tax. We could take some of the pressure off the people by lowering the property tax. We should keep trying for it.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“We are in tough times, but I do think, ideally, we should have a planner. With the economy, we’re starting to see a light at the end of the tunnel, and I think we’re heading in that direction.”

DISTRICT 4

MARC 'TIM' LASHOMB

Age: 66.

Party: Republican.

Education: LeMoyne College.

Occupation: Owner of Lashomb Insurance Agency.

Previous government experience: County legislator, three years.

Civic organizations: Knights of Columbus; Malone Catholic Parishes; Holy Family School Foundation Board member; Cornell Cooperative Extension director; founder and director of Malone Revitalization Foundation; and many more.

Family: Four children, Jennifer, Mary Katherine, Michael and Dan; five grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“When I was elected in 2010, I felt my almost 40 years of private-sector business experience would allow me to make a significant contribution to helping with county operations and budgeting. The business principles are similar. However, the policy and procedures are vastly different. I have learned much about county operations, and I now have a better understanding of the challenges facing our county. I feel with that experience, I can continue to help address the fiscal and operational challenges that must be resolved if we are going to achieve the efficiencies necessary for responsible and effective county-government operations.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“Tourism is an important economic driver, and dilapidated structures on our main streets and side streets impose a terrible view of what our communities have to offer. We must remove them if we are going to make our communities a destination, not a pass-through. The amount we establish does not come from property taxes but other sources, such as the sale of county-owned property.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“Our economic growth will be determined on how we respond to the challenges of attracting tourists, and we must maximize our use of tourism funds to reach as many potential visitors as possible. I supported an occupancy tax with the understanding these funds will be used for tourism development and not added to our general fund.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“When I took office in 2011, I requested the board allow me to re-apply for a grant to study possibilities of establishing some type of planning concept. We were awarded a grant, and the study is to be completed by the end of the year. It was made clear that no property-tax revenue is to be used for any type of planning concept, and I believe the Franklin County Industrial Development Agency can play a significant role in developing a planning concept. We have missed many grants that would have contributed to economic development.”

CARL SHERWIN

Age: 63.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Medical degree, University of Nevada at Reno.

Occupation: Retired physician; consultant for Alcoa and Franklin County Jail.

Civic organizations: Barnabas House volunteer; Lifeway Community Church Board of Trustees.

Family: Wife, Barbara; two adult children; three grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I feel compelled to get involved. I’ve been hearing it from people that we are absolutely wasting our assets. I expect to work 40 to 50 hours a week, and I do my homework, and I don’t let go when there is a right way to do things.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“If you check with an architect, $35,000 isn’t going to do it. You need to look at the buildings on a case-by-case basis and consider how dangerous it is and if there is historical or architectural value and a way to salvage those.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“One of the things we desperately need to do is increase tourism in the area, so if an occupancy tax works in other places, why not here? I’d expect a tax, and for the county not to be charging it doesn’t make sense.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“Part of the reason we are in the situation we’re in is because we don’t have a plan. The challenge is if you get someone who is not trained in the job, you get a poor plan. But if you want to succeed, you have to hire a professional planner.”

DISTRICT 5

DON DABIEW

Age: 58.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Wayne State University, Michigan.

Occupation: Co-owner of The Olde School in Brushton; retired General Motors employee; former owner of Dabiew’s Market, Bombay.

Previous government experience: Town of Bombay supervisor, three years; Bombay Town Council, five years; director of Town of Bombay Park.

Civic organizations: Franklin County Industrial Development Agency Board of Directors; Franklin County Association of Senior Citizens Board of Directors; president, Covell Bay Housing Office Board of Directors; Fort Covington Adult Center Board of Directors.

Family: Wife, Ann; two children, Christy and Michael; two grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I feel enough is not being done. I am a well-rounded person with business experience and experience as both a town supervisor and a member of the Town Council, and I think I’m well suited to bring that experience up to the county level.

“There should be more communication between the county and the towns. I don’t think that’s happening at all. I think it is good to know what issues there are and see if we can help the towns that way.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“If you don’t make anything look better, how can you ask more from taxpayers? These buildings aren’t safe, and they’re going to fall down. It’s not just a local issue.

“It’s a good idea to put money aside for this because, in the long run, it will get the property back on the tax base. Maybe there are ways to do it cheaper, but if you don’t talk about it, you don’t know.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I don’t know how it could hurt us. Local people aren’t paying for it, and it would be good for the county. The other counties around us are doing it. And tourism is about the only business we have.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“In a way, we need it, and it would be good, but I don’t like the county taking on another department. I’d have to weigh the difference and talk to my five towns and see what they think. If three of the five want it, no matter how I feel personally, I would vote for it.”

SUE ROBIDEAU

Age: 62.

Party: Republican.

Education: High-school diploma.

Occupation: Retired director of financial assistance, Franklin County Department of Social Services.

Previous government experience: County legislator, three years; 30 years in county government.

Civic organizations: Moira Historical Association, Malone Ladies of the Moose and Brushton-Moira American Legion Auxiliary.

Family: Husband, Raymond “Bud” Robideau; a daughter, Melissa; a son, Jeff; stepson, Eric; three grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I feel a major component of being a successful county legislator is the ability to understand a wide variety of issues and work effectively with individuals, businesses, not-for-profit organizations, local government and people of all parties. I truly enjoy being a legislator; it’s a real learning experience. I feel I’ve done a good job representing the people to the best of my ability, and I will continue to do so.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“Every town has them, and I think they need to be cleaned up, but the towns can’t afford it. They need a break at the landfill, but it would still expensive for towns. I hope we can work with every single town to get at least one building down.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I’m definitely in favor of an occupancy tax, and I’m in favor of tourism. I think there is a lot to offer. Who wouldn’t want to come to Franklin County in the fall? The occupancy tax will bring in money to go to promoting tourism.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“I’m not sure. We’re still doing a feasibility study through Cornell Cooperative Extension, but personally, I don’t think Franklin County can afford such a thing. My towns don’t think they need it, but it’s still up in the air until the study’s done.”

DISTRICT 7

EDWIN RANDIG

Age: 50.

Party: Republican.

Education: North Country Community College; SUNY Oswego.  

Occupation: Zoning administrator/code-enforcement officer, Town of Harrietstown.

Family: Wife, Alyssa; three children, Taylor, Kelsey and Dylan.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“My mom served on the School Board for 10 years and was politically motivated and kept up on politics, so that always interested me. I’ve done my job a number of years, I’ve raised my family, but I still feel I have more to give the community.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“These are buildings on the tax rolls that are dilapidated and have code issues. This really should be looked at from a methodical standpoint because it can get costly. (Demolition and removal) costs should go to the property owner on the taxes. Why should it all go on the backs of taxpayers? The owner should be charged for the expenses.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“It’s a good idea. It’s working for Essex County, and it’s from the transient people who are coming to the area for a night or two who are going downtown and using services and walking around, which shows a community is vibrant.

“At the code office, we’re seeing more building permits going out, so there’s an influx of people who will be doing work on their homes. The plumbers, guy at the lumber yard, this is keeping everybody busy. All of that keeps the local economy going.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“I think it’s a good idea as a county to have the ability to plan for county-wide projects as long as it can be paid for.”

CURTIS REYNOLDS

Age: 51.

Party: Independence.

Education: North Country Community College.

Occupation: Retired correction officer.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“I want to represent the people of my district and people countywide, and if I’m fortunate enough to be elected, I will do it to the best of my ability. Major issues need to be addressed, and I know it’s going to be an uphill push.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“Auction off the property, and let the bidder pay for the cleanup. The bidder will know that going in, with the understanding you will be responsible for cleaning this up. If the county inherits a property, I’d take it and sell it at auction.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I think, in the southern end of the county, we are fortunate to hopefully have development of 80-plus rooms at the Hotel Saranac. But it’s not fair to that owner that he will have to try to adjust his charge to include a 5 percent bed tax. I attended the hearings in Saranac Lake, and there are people in Paul Maroun’s district who are barely keeping their doors open now. I hope, if it passes, (tourism promotion) will be spread out equally among the townships.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“It’s something that needs more study and something I’d need to get clarification on with the board as a whole.”

BARBARA RICE

Age: 48.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, SUNY Plattsburgh; pre-med, Bennington College; physician’s assistant certification, Albany Medical College.  

Occupation: Co-owner of Rice Furniture with her husband; sister, Sue Rice; and brother-in-law, Clyde Baker.

Previous government experience: Saranac Lake Village Board, two years; Local Development Corporation Board of Directors, 2½ years; Harrietstown Board of Assessment and Review, two years.  

Civic organizations: Habitat for Humanity, Saranac Lake Downtown Committee, Harrietstown Democratic Committee, Saranac Lake Chamber of Commerce and more.

Family: Husband, Chad McCarthy; son, Cal Rice.

Why did you decide to run for office?

“It’s an interesting time to be involved politically. It’s very challenging, but I look at it as an opportunity as well to go and really make a difference and to be part of the solution to some of the issues the county is facing. It’s an opportunity for me to use the knowledge, experience and skills I’ve acquired along the way and apply it to solving county problems.”

Franklin County set aside funds in the 2014 tentative budget for removing blighted buildings. Do you agree with this use of taxpayer funds?

“This is something that needs to be addressed. Anything we do to improve the appearance in a community and make it more welcoming and a potential spot for a new business to go is important. It is a reasonable use of taxpayer money.”

Franklin County plans to pursue State Legislature approval of a 5 percent occupancy tax on overnight guests. What is your opinion?

“I’m in favor of an occupancy tax. It’s a source of revenue that doesn’t burden local taxpayers. We have to look at new ways to generate revenue. Other places have it, and it is done successfully for tourism and marketing. I’m a big advocate for pursuing it.”

Are you in favor of Franklin County having a county planner?

“The county is in a tight fiscal position, but you can’t sit on your butt and hope growth comes your way. You have to be proactive, which is a key point to drive local economic development. With employment comes an increase in sales tax and property-tax revenue. But you’ve got to have a plan.”

OTHER RACES

District Attorney: Derek Champagne (R).

County Treasurer: Bryon Varin (D).

County Coroner (vote for two): Martin Hughes II (R); Bert Wilcox (R).

Legislature District 1: Guy "Tim" Smith (D).

Legislature District 2: Billy Jones (D).

Legislature District 6: Paul Maroun (R).

TOWN RACES

BANGOR

Town supervisor: Gary Monica (D, R).

Town clerk: Linda Shova (D, R).

Town Council (vote for two): Tim Tallman (R, Action Party); Gerald Perry (D).

Town Council (two-year unexpired term): Joey St. Mary (D).

Tax collector: Sharon Debyah (D, R).

Highway superintendent: Jamie St. Hilaire (D, R).

BELLMONT

Town Council (vote for two): Greg Langdon (Sunrise Party); Wayne Rogers (R, Sunrise Party).

Highway superintendent: Lee Davis (R, Sunrise Party).

BOMBAY

Town supervisor: Mary Frances Taylor (D).

Town clerk: Jennifer Reardon (D).

Town justice: Terrance Durant (D).

Town Council (vote for two): James Brann (D); Jacque Leduc (D).

Tax collector: Ann Dabiew (D).

Highway superintendent: Jamie Durant (D).

BRANDON

TOWN COUNCIL

(Vote for two):

GARY GONIA

Party: Democrat.

Age: 62.

Education: Brushton-Moira Central School.

Occupation: Truck driver, Harris Oil.

Previous government experience: Town Council member, since 2001.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if 

elected?

"I don't see where we have any, as far as I can see, big issues in the town. So I  guess the only thing I can try to do is try to keep taxes down."

DALE MARSHALL

Party: Republican.

Age: 64.

Education: Malone Central School.

Occupation: Retired, Alcoa fleet maintenance mechanic. 

Military service: National Guard, six years.

Previous government experience: Bangor Grievance Board member, 1988-present.

Civic organizations: Bangor Fire Department, honorary member Family: Wife, Maureen; 4 adult children

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if 

elected?

"I think the biggest issue is if we can keep the taxes down as low as possible. I'm retired so I've got lots of time to devote to the Rec Park for our children, and I'd like to get all the people involved. I like to listen to the people to help make them make our town better."

Ronald Goyea (R) (D), Could not be reached for comment.

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Michael Lawrence (D, R). 

Town clerk: Christine Marshall (R).

Town justice: David Stevens (D); Emily Lawrence (R). 

Tax collector: Mary Gokey (R, D).

Highway superintendent: Gary Marshall (D, R, Voice of the People).

BRIGHTON

TOWN COUNCIL

(Vote for two)

AMBER McKERNAN

Party: Democrat.

Age: 66.

Education: Notre Dame High School; bachelor's degree, D'Youville College. 

Occupation: Retired medical technician.

Previous government experience: Brighton tax collector, 2001 through 2011.

Civic organizations: Lake Placid Curling Club member.

Family: Husband, Thomas; three adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them? 

"Like every other community, we must be mindful of our budget, staying under the 2 percent tax cap as dictated by the state and still being able to provide all of the services that we need to provide for the citizens of our community and generally keeping the town of Brighton a wonderful place to live."

STEVE TUCKER

Party: Democrat, Independent (not sponsored).

Age: 58.

Education: Saranac Lake High School; bachelor's degree, Clarkson University.

Occupation: Co-owner, operator at Tucker Farms.

Previous government experience: Brighton Town Council member, 12 years. 

Civic organizations: Brighton Fire Department volunteer, Knights of Columbus.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"Like everybody else, we've got a state-mandated 2 percent tax cap, and insurance always goes up more than 2 percent. Everything goes up more than 2 percent. We've been able to cut back here and there, so our fund balance isn't in too bad of shape, but we have used some of it. We're still going through the budget process, but we're pretty confident we can keep it under the 2 percent cap."

SARAH KNAPP

Party: Republican.

Age: 30.

Education: Saranac Lake Central School, bachelor's degree, North Country Community College.

Occupation: Adirondack Audiology Associates manager.

Family: Husband, Andrew; two daughters.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"It’s time for some changes to come to the Town of Brighton and to make our residents more aware of what is going on within the town and its officials, and I would hope to bring in a new population of young people and their interests."

OTHER RACES

Highway superintendent: Andy Crary (R, D, C).

Town supervisor: Peter Shrope (D, R, C).

BURKE

TOWN SUPERVISOR

DAVID VINCENT

Party:  Republican. 

Age: 57.

Education: Franklin Academy High School; Ag-Tech School vocational degree, Malone. 

Occupation: Farmer.

Previous government experience: Town supervisor; Town Council, 2000 to 2012.

Civic organizations: Franklin County Farm Service Agency, president; Franklin County Soil and Water, treasurer; former member, Burke Fire Department. 

Family: Wife, Mary, children; four daughters, Pam, Patty, Valerie, Stephanie.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected:

"The biggest issue facing most towns today is the increase in state-mandated programs and no money to back them up. We're constantly facing that challenge.

"Our latest accomplishment is that we have purchased the former U.S. Border Patrol building on Route 11 for our new Town Hall.

"With all these challenges, we are still working on zero to .05 percent raise in taxes. I'm fortunate to have a board that works very well together and is very diligent."

 

ALBERT JOHNSON 

Party: Registered Republican; declined nomination, running on Democrat ticket.

Age: 70.

Education: Franklin Academy, Malone; Humboldt Institute, Minneapolis, Minn.

Occupation: Dairy farmer.

Previous government experience: Town supervisor, 2009 to 2011.

Civic organizations: Franklin County Cooperative Extension; past member, Farm Bureau.

Family: Wife, Shirley; three adult children, Christine, Shawn, Chrystal.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"Property taxes and the New York state tax cap. I feel strongly that we try to stay underneath the cap. Property taxes are becoming unbearable. Town and villages are stressed for money; so are people.

"Taxes were raised 5.2 percent in 2012; I'd like to see our taxes stay under 2 percent. We have to cut expenses to keep under control. Can't spend more than you got. As supervisor, I stayed under the 2 percent."

OTHER RACES

Town clerk: Elizabeth Downing (R); Stassa Neddo (D).

Town Council (vote for two): Timothy Crippen (D, Agriculture); James Otis (R, Agriculture).   

Tax collector: Bertha Leavitt (R).

Highway superintendent: Thomas Russell (R); Bryce LaPlante (D, People’s Choice).

CHATEAUGAY

TOWN COUNCIL

WILLIAM NEMIER

Party: Democrat.

Age: 46.

Education: Chateaugay Central School; one year, Clinton Community College.

Occupation: Correction officer, Bare Hill Correctional Facility.

Family: Wife, Melissa; two children, Harry and Sophia.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"I'd like to see the skate rink go through. I grew up here all my life, and when I was younger, that's what we did. We always had skating. I'd like to see more things for the kids so they don't have to be on the computers all the time.

The proposed closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility is "going to have a major impact. They're all good-paying jobs. I know they're saying they won't be laid off, but they'll have to move around to different areas, and in a little town like this, it will really have a big impact.

"Maybe we can see if there will be other jobs to move into in the area. I don't know what they would do with that building, but maybe try to get somebody to come in there and do something instead of just having it sit around."

FREDRICK COOK

Party: Republican.

Age: 59.

Education: Chateaugay Central School.

Occupation: Retired, New York State Department of Transportation.

Military service: U.S. Air Force.

Previous government experience: Chateaugay Town Council, 1993 to 2013.

Civic organizations: American Legion.

Family: Wife, Lorrie; three adult sons.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected? 

"The biggest thing is that our Town Hall was in bad need of a lot of repairs, and we've been working for the last two or three years quite hard to get these things done. We've made quite a bit of progress, but there's still more to be done, which is why I want to run again.

"We had a big rally (for Chateaugay Correctional Facility). We had over 600 people there. We're not done there; we're going to fight to keep it open. It's going to be an awful detriment to the town and village of Chateaugay if we lose it. I talked with the village mayor the other day, and they think it's going to cost each taxpayer about $135 more."

WILLIAM TROMBLY

Party: Republican.

Age: 48.

Education: Chateaugay Central School; Canton ATC degree; SUNY Oswego degree.

Occupation: Lieutenant, New York State Department of Corrections.

Previous government experience: Village trustee, 1990 to 1995; Village mayor, 1996; Town Council, 1998 to present.

Civic organizations: Chateaugay Volunteer Fire Department, Knights of Columbus.

Family: Wife, Mary Beth; three adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them if elected? 

"With county taxes going up, school taxes going up, I think it's important for us with that extra source of revenue to try to keep taxes down on the town level in order to offset some of the increases at other levels of government.

"Taking away 111 full-time, good-paying jobs (due to the proposed closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility) is not what I call any type of economic stimulus, which is what Gov. Cuomo has indicated he wants to do for the North Country, and it seems to be just the opposite of an attempt like that.

"Of course, we're hoping the governor changes his mind and keeps it a state facility. But if he doesn't, I hope an all-out effort can be made between the state and the Town of Chateaugay and Franklin County to find another use for it which could employ people and keep that economic engine going in this area."

CONSTABLE

Town supervisor: Richard Onufer (D).

Town clerk: Sue Prue (R).

Town Council (vote for two): Melanie Lemire (D); Stanley Tulip (D).

Tax collector: Sheri Eaton (D).

Highway superintendent: Larry Martin (D).

Assessor: Laurie Marshall (D).

DICKINSON

Town supervisor: Sherry Smith (R, Unity).

Town clerk: Tammy Daggett (D, R).

Town Council (vote for two): Robert Clark II (R, Unity); William Greenwood (R).

Tax collector: Kelly Clark (R, D, Unity).

Highway superintendent: Joseph Clookey (R).

DUANE

Town supervisor: Ned Lemieux Sr. (R, D).

Town clerk: Sue Nitto (D, R).

Town Council (vote for two): Rita Gordon (D, R); Mark Young (D, R).

Highway superintendent: Ned Lemieux Jr. (R, D).

Town justice: Jim Lalonde (R, D).

FORT COVINGTON

Town supervisor: Patricia Manchester (D, Unity).

Town clerk: Christine Benway (D); Joni Mitchell Oliver (R).

Town Council (vote for two): Paul Lauzon (D, Unity); David Russell (D).

Tax collector: Karen Stowell (D).

Highway superintendent: Gerard Leroux (R).

Town justice: Christopher Nye (D); Tony Leroux (R).

FRANKLIN

TOWN COUNCIL

TOM BARTISS

Party: Independent; endorsed by Democrat and Republican parties.

Age: 37.

Education: Westhaven High School; associate's and bachelor's degree, Paul Smith's College.

Occupation: Forester/logger.

Civic organizations: Vice president, Loon Lake Homeowners Association.

Family: Wife, Rose; daughter, Emily.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them if elected?

"The biggest issue is always keeping the taxes relative and making proper business decisions. We're just trying to go forward rather than backward, especially with the current economy."

DONALD HAMM

Party: Republican, Independent, Integrity Party.

Age: 68.

Education: Saranac Lake High School.

Occupation: Owner, Whiteface Construction, Don Hamm Farms, Don's Auto and Equipment.

Military service: National Guard Armory, Saranac Lake.

Family: Wife, Doris; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"We're actually a bedroom community. The majority of the people are retired here. There's no industry here in the Town of Franklin to amount to anything. Very few businesses. We own a lot of land. The state owns the majority of it. With the state mandates and the acquisitions, our town has got to run super efficient in order to keep the taxes in check so the original residents or people who aren't wealthy can afford to live here."

MARY ELLEN KEITH

Party: Democrat, running independent.

Age: 84.

Education: Saranac Lake High School; associate degree,North Country Community College.

Occupation: Retired, licensed practical nurse.

Previous government experience: Franklin town supervisor, 1980 to 1992 and 2003 to 2009.

Civic organizations: St. Paul's Food Pantry coordinator, Town of Franklin 55-Plus Club, vice president, St. Paul's Church organist.

Family: Widow; nine children, seven foster children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"I will certainly scrutinize the bills. I've read all the statements, their monthly statements, and I know what's going on.

"We have a wonderful summer program at the playground (but) our youngsters have no place for a toilet; they have one portable potty and no place to wash their hands. ... I'm going to work to make sure we get something up at that park for the community and for our kids. ... It's a wonderfully run program, but it has no priority in this town board of getting something up there or doing anything creative to get something up there."

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Arthur Willman Jr. (R, Integrity).

Town clerk: Lauren Lefebvre (D, R, Integrity).

Highway superintendent: Jacques Demars (R, Integrity). 

Town justice: Roger Symonds (D).

HARRIETSTOWN 

TOWN COUNCIL

(Four-year term)

EDWARD J. GOETZ JR.

Party: Democrat, Independent.

Age: 63.

Education: Bachelor's degree, SUNY Brockport.

Occupation: Retired, New York State Department of Corrections.

Previous government experience: Saranac Lake Central School Board, six years.

Civic organizations: Saranac Lake Pee Wee Hockey; former president and secretary/treasurer, Saranac Lake Youth Baseball/Softball Association; high-school basketball and football official; former collegiate women’s basketball official; ECAC Division 1 AA, collegiate football official.

Family: Wife, Susan; two sons, Brian and Steven; four grandchildren.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“Hopefully, if I am elected, we can maintain budget expenditure at or below the tax cap. I would also hope to examine the operations and cost of managing the Adirondack Regional Airport. That seems to be a very big bone of contention within the town. It is a major expense within the budget, balanced solely on the backs of Harrietstown taxpayers. I think that financial support for airport operations should be more diverse within the surrounding townships.

"The town is coming through a tumultuous time with its past supervisor, one in which I don’t think the taxpayers think they were being heard. Hopefully, I can give them a voice."

RONALD B. KEOUGH

Party: Republican, Conservative.

Age: 77.

Education: Saranac Lake High School, St. Michael’s College, Simmons Mortuary School.

Occupation: Owner, Fortune-Keough Funeral Home.

Previous government experience: Harrietstown Town Council, 30-plus years; former deputy town supervisor, four years; former Harrietstown town supervisor, 10 years; served on Building and Grounds Committee; founding member, Dewey Mountain organizational committee; Harrietstown Business Park Committee; community government representative for Town Council; former member, Fire Advisory Board.

Civic organizations: Saranac Lake Winter Carnival Committee; Rotary Club of Saranac Lake, board member and past president; Saranac Lake Elks Lodge; Knights of Columbus; former coach, Little League Baseball and Pee Wee Hockey; former and organizing member, Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department, 10 years active duty.

Family: Wife, Margaret; five sons, Mike, Pat, Tim, Brendan and Bryan; 14 grandchildren.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I want to continue to work to complete repairs on the Town Hall and the retaining wall along the river that was damaged in flooding in 2011. Also I would address structural issues at the Town Hall, which are on the exterior and interior of the building.

"If re-elected, I want to continue to work on renovations at Dewey Mountain, working with the volunteers to fund the building of the new lodge.

"In addition, I want to continue to work on the Harrietstown Business Park and move forward with a realistic plan for continued development of the facility, increased opportunity for employment and an increased tax base.

"The other piece is to continue to work with the Town Council, the Chamber and the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism on marketing plans for economic development of the area, making the Harrietstown Town Hall, Dewey Mountain, the Adirondack Regional Airport and the Harrietstown Business Park points of destination.

"I would like to continue in my community to work with others to achieve prudent, positive and effective use of taxpayer dollars and community services." 

PATRICIA MEAGHER

Party: Republican, Conservative.

Age: 62.

Education: St. Pius X High School; SUNY Cobleskill; associate's degree, North Country Community College.

Occupation: Retired, deputy town clerk, court clerk and deputy tax collector, Town of Harrietstown.

Family: Husband, Richard; two daughters, Jennifer and Amy; two grandsons.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I hope to give back to the taxpayers. I’ve been paid by the residents of Harrietstown for 12 years and would look to spend the taxpayer dollars in the most efficient way, while completing the issues critical to the town.

"Right now, we have several structural and repair issues with the Town Hall that need to be completed. Urgently we need to fix the retaining wall along the Saranac River.

"There are ongoing fiscal and renovation issues at the airport.

"I am concerned about the taxpayer dollar being spent wisely."

TOWN COUNCIL 

(Two-year term)

GERALD GILLMETT

Party: Independence Party; running on Republican and Conservative lines.

Age: 69.

Education: St. Pius X High School; Paul Smith’s College.

Occupation: Retired, self-employed electrical contractor.

Previous government experience: Former Franklin County legislator, 11 years.

Civic organizations: Past member and previous president, Saranac Lake Lions Club; Saranac Lake Moose Club; member and past president, Lake Clear Association; member and past president, Saranac Lake Mountaineers Rugby Club; former member Franklin County 4-H Camp Committee; member, past president Franklin Snowmobilers Inc.; member and past president Tri-Lakes Snowmobile Club; former Catholic Youth Organization leader; former 4-H Club leader; Little League coach; past president, St. John’s Parish Council; volunteer, Boilermaker 15K Road Race in Utica.

Family: Three daughters, Tammie, Yvette, Christine.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“Recalling my experience as legislator, I hope to keep taxes under control. During my tenure as chairman of the Franklin County Board of Legislators, taxes went down close to 5 percent. I would work to achieve the same in the town government.

"Also, I think it’s important that I am the only chairman of the board of legislators to appoint a vice chairman of the opposite party. I would hope to achieve bipartisan cooperation on the Town Council.

"While I was a legislator, I was chairman of the Franklin County Highway Committee and remain an honorary member. With that experience, I can help the town in any aspect of highway services coordination. I also was instrumental as legislator not only in maintaining DMV office in Saranac Lake but also in increasing services there to five days a week. The DMV operation is a very important aspect of county services in Saranac Lake, and I would work to maintain that location and hours.

"I would also like to see if I could get more cooperation between the towns, county and municipalities that use the Adirondack Regional Airport. With my experience and background, I could sit down with representatives of the surrounding towns and achieve that cooperation."

HOWARD J. RILEY

Party: Democratic, Unity.

Age: 83.

Education: Saranac Lake High School.

Occupation: Retired newpaperman; historian; author; manager, Lake Placid Club.

Previous government experience: Former Saranac Lake mayor; former trustee, Saranac Lake Village Board; four years, Harrietstown Town Council; six years, Harrietstown town justice.

Civic organizations: Former member, Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce; former member Adirondack Scenic Railroad Board of Directors; former member Adirondack Medical Center Board; Lake Placid Skating Club; member, Hall of Fame Selection Committee.

Military service: U.S. Army National Guard, nine years.

Family: Six children, Keefe, Kurt, Keegan, Kasey, Kean, Kelby.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I want to help the Chamber of Commerce market the Town Hall. It’s the nicest building we have downtown and needs more use.

"The other concern is the Adirondack Regional Airport in Lake Clear. Not any criticism to anyone who has run or is running it, but I would work to help oversee the upcoming renovations, which are badly needed.

"I also think I really can help with the merging of the town and village court system, a process that is starting in April 2014. I think I will be able to help the new town justice because I can certainly tell him what not to do.

"This is a two-year term, and that’s perfect for me. My mission is to cooperate with the board and do what is best for the taxpayers of Harrietstown."

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Robert Bevilacqua (R, C).

Town clerk: Patricia Gillmett (R, C).

Highway superintendent: Craig Donaldson (R, C).

MALONE 

TOWN COUNCIL

HENRY GONYEA

Age: 76.

Party: Republican.

Education: High-school.

Occupation: Retired equipment manager, State Department of Transportation; co-owner of J. Gonyea Enterprises.

Civic organizations: Malone Elks Lodge; Notre Dame Church.

Military: U.S. Marine Corps, retired as a corporal.

Family: Wife, Judith; four children; 16 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

“I’ve lived here all my life. I believe that we need some changes, and that’s not happening. We need industry in this town because taxpayers are beaten to death with taxes. There isn’t very much being done to solve the problem. If I’m elected, I’ll do the best I can for the Town of Malone people.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“Our biggest issue is to get industry in here, but I haven’t come up with any (ideas) yet. I’d like to see us blacktop roads instead of grading them because when you grade a road, it washes away and you have to do it over again.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District?

“In my mind, no. When you start sharing services between three different departments that are all different — the village, the town and the school — there is going to be conflict. The village and the town could do it together, but not with the school and a bus garage.”

MARY SCHARF

Age: 62.

Party: Democrat.

Education: Bachelor’s degree, master’s degrees, St. Lawrence University.

Occupation: Retired Spanish teacher.

Previous government experience: Town Council, four years.

Civic organizations: Greater Malone Chamber of Commerce; Foothills Arts Society; Franklin County and Town of Malone Democratic Party Committee.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

"It was a hard decision. But I’m still young and energetic and feel I’ve contributed. I believe in a better economy, better education and a better environment. Voters feel like they have no control. It’s frustrating. Citizens do not know what government is doing nor do they understand why we do things. This is due to a lack of educating on the part of elected officials and should be considered a requirement all elected officials.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“I think tourism is our future because we’re not going to get an IBM. Our major asset is our beauty.

"We need more shared services. The code offices should be combined, and Highway and Public Works. They are already doing projects together, but I think we can save more money in that area.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District? 

“I think it’s a good idea and a way to lower our expenses, but whether the FAA is going to allow it could be a problem. This is a shared service, and it would save both entities money because 90 percent of it is funding with state aid.”

PATRICK SHERWIN

Age: 66.

Party: Conservative, Republican.

Education: High-school and some college classes.

Occupation: Retired farmer and heavy-equipment operator/contractor.

Previous government experience: Former Town of Brandon supervisor; former Brandon Town Council member.

Civic organizations: Knights of Columbus; St. Joseph’s Church.

Family: Six adult children; two foster sons.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

“I enjoyed it when I was in the Town of Brandon, but I really did it to help myself and other taxpayers with their taxes. This 2 percent tax cap is something that really has to be done because people just can’t afford it.

"There were 14 of us growing up, and I am well experienced in how to pinch a dollar. I have nothing to gain from this personally. It’s just for the people, and anyone can feel free to contact me for any reason.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“I think combined services are the big thing. I don’t think shared services are the best idea. It might work for buying purposes, but I don’t think the rest of it would work.

"There is talk about solar power, and I think it’s probably a good idea. Sometimes you’ve got to spend money to save money, but I’d like to hear more about it before we go diving in.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District?

“No. They are two different entities all together. Shared services might work with the school and village, but if it’s a shared salt barn, say, who loads the vehicles and how do you keep it separate? And there are too many ifs and buts, and I don’t think it will save the taxpayers anything.”

JACK SULLIVAN

Age: 71.

Party: Democrat.

Education: SUNY Plattsburgh; Cornell University.

Occupation: Retired physical-science and physics teacher; retired auctioneer.

Previous government experience: Eight years, Malone Town Council.

Civic organizations: Habitat for Humanity, Kiwanis Club, Malone Fish and Game Club, Malone Elks.

Family: Wife, Barbara; five children; 10 grandchildren.

Why did you decide to run for office this year?

“I really enjoy it, and there are a lot of things I want to continue on, like solar energy at the town buildings, which looks quite promising, and working on a comprehensive plan for the town and reworking our zoning regulations so they fit in the with the village’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Project.”

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the Town of Malone?

“Shared services are certainly still alive. The town is strapped for money, but I would hope we could continue improving roads. The only practical solution would be making small repairs over time because it’s not only the paving, it’s the wetlands and brooks and culverts that have to be replaced.”

Do you think the town should pursue a shared transportation facility/highway garage with the Malone Central School District?

"The plan’s been changed a couple of times, and it looks promising, but it will be an uphill battle with the FAA. I’d like to see it happen.”

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Howard Maneely (D, R, C).

Highway superintendent: Thomas Shanty (R).

MOIRA

SUPERVISOR

JAMES BEGOR

Party: Democrat.

Age: 56.

Education: Dover Junior-Senior High School, Dover Plains. 

Occupation: Retired manager at State Department Environmental Conservation maintenance center; Malone Central School District bus driver.

Previous government experience: Town of Moira code enforcement officer, three years; Democratic Party Committee, Town of Moira. 

Family: Lynne Santor.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected:

"There needs to be more oversight of people who are working for our town." 

BURTON PECK IV

Party: Republican.

Age: 49.

Education: Brushton-Moira Central School; associate's degree, Paul Smith's College; bachelor's degree and master's degree, SUNY Potsdam; master's degree, Vermont Law School; master's degree, St. Lawrence University. 

Occupation: Business and English teacher, Massena High School.

Previous government experience: Moira Republican Committee.

Civic organizations: Little League baseball coach, Massena Federation of Teachers Union, vice president.  

Family: Wife, Kimberly.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community, and how would you address them if elected?

"To keep costs down and still maintain a good level of services. This is a daunting task because there are a lot of mandates by the state, and the financial components are challenging. I would have to sit and see where we are at to figure out ways to save money, look at grants that could help, any kind of opportunity to save money, like shared services to provide services but not cost somebody a job. I'm of the belief it's about serving the community."

TOWN COUNCIL

MARTY BURNETT

Party: Democrat.

Age: 55.

Education: Brushton-Moira Central School.

Occupation: Retired, head custodian at Brushton-Moira Central School.

Previous government experience: Moira Town Council, 20 years.

Civic organizations: Deputy Franklin County fire coordinator; Brushton-Moira Volunteer Fire Department and EMS.

Family: Wife, Connie; two sons.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"The biggest one is the lack of money to try to cover all your requirements. Everybody is doing more with less. It's very challenging with rises in benefits and insurances and all the other little fuel and heating costs. And with a 2 percent cap, it makes it a tremendous challenge to balance all of that. I'd like to think I'd be a contributing factor. Obviously, I'd like to thank the public for supporting me for the last 20 years, but hopefully they have confidence in the decisions I'm making."

DARRIN JOCK

Party: Republican.

Age: 43.

Education: Franklin Academy.

Occupation: Shared transportation supervisor, Brushton-Moira Central School, St. Regis Central School.

Civic organizations: New York Association of Pupil Transportation.

Family: Wife, Teresa, three children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"The biggest issue I'd say, and it rings through in every community, is taxes. I've been a resident for 20 years of this area, and I'm hoping that we can look and find ways to keep taxes down and still give the community everything that's needed to be a strong, safe and clean environment."

TIMOTHY TRIMM

Party: Republican.

Age: 53.

Education: Bruston-Moira Central School; college courses, Cornell University.

Occupation: New York state correction officer.

Civic organizations: Fire chief, Moira Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department.

Family: Wife, Susan; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"The biggest issue with all communities is probably their taxes, and I'm just going to try to keep taxes at bay."

OTHER RACES

Town clerk: Kathleen Laramay (R).

Tax collector: Rita White (R).

Highway superintendent: James Helm (D, R). 

Town justice: James Durant (D).

SANTA CLARA

Town supervisor: Marcel “Mickey” Webb (R).

Town clerk/tax collector: Laurie McGill (R).

Town Council (vote for two): Philip Durkin (R); David Perry (R).

Highway superintendent: Andrew McGill (R).

TOWN OF TUPPER LAKE 

SUPERVISOR

ROGER AMELL

Party: Democrat.

Age: 56.

Education: Tupper Lake High School.

Occupation: Owner, Amell Logging Inc.

Previous government experience: Town supervisor, eight years.

Civic organizations: Tupper Lake Rotary Club, Tupper Lake Snowmobile Club, Tupper Lake Rod & Gun Club, ARISE volunteer, Big Tupper Ski Area volunteer, Track & Field construction project member, Multi-Use Trail Committee.

Family: Wife, Mary Kay; three children, Jason, Kayla, Troy.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“I would hope to see the mountain project and development get off the ground. The Adirondack Club and Resort has been through eight years of review and mediation, and I’ve been involved heavily in the process. 

"I know what we have had to do to get to this point. I would continue to advocate and work in local planning to see the project continues moving in the right direction. We also have a plan for new projects at the Tupper Lake Country Club — we are looking to winterize part of the building to add revenue, and that is something I would like to see through to completion. 

"There are other projects to draw tourism and improve town facilities. I also would like to move ahead with upgrades at our beachfront facility at Little Wolf. The town is going to be purchasing a new snowmobile trail groomer, and we are expanding, grooming trails within Franklin County that connect to trails in St. Lawrence County. 

"There is a plan for a new trail system along Route 3 into Piercefield that connects to Conifer and Cranberry Lake. Snowmobile traffic in winter is very important for local business. It does mean a lot for Tupper Lake — snowmobilers bring fresh revenue when things are slow, which is good for the restaurants and local businesses, the gas stations and machine repair shops. 

"In my last eight years as town supervisor, the taxpayers came first. And everybody’s a taxpayer. I’ve done my best to keep taxes low, and we’ve never overridden the tax cap, and we did it all without going without. We have been fortunate to have a little bit of growth every year. The added assessed value does help with increased revenue."

PATRICIA S. LITTLEFIELD

Party: Republican, Independence, Conservative, Independent, Bright Future.

Age: 56.

Education: Tupper Lake High School; Ogdensburg Business School.

Occupation: Corporate compliance officer, North Country Home Services; former compliance officer and administrator, Adirondack ARC.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake Town Council; former member, Town of Tupper Lake Board of Assessment Review, four years; former member, Zoning Board of Appeals, four years.

Civic organizations: Foster Grandparent Advisory Board; former manager, Skating Club of Tupper Lake, 11 years, past member Holy Ghost Academy School Board, St. Alphonsus Church Parish Council. 

Family: Husband, Kevin; son, Owen and daughter, Hannah.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“I would like to have the opportunity to continue to work for the people of Tupper Lake as town supervisor. I have followed local government all my life, since my father was a village trustee, mayor and then county legislator. Monitoring tax rates is something I consider a high priority, especially when it concerns seniors or those on fixed incomes trying to maintain their livelihoods, as well as the young people who are making Tupper Lake their home. 

"I hope to achieve and create opportunities for our young people so they can return home and prosper here. It is very exciting to see how so many young people are now working toward home-ownership here. 

"We need to keep up the great efforts to promote Tupper Lake and work with local groups to develop a consistent brand for Tupper Lake for tourism. Recreation is key to moving Tupper Lake ahead and offers an enticement to anyone wanting to relocate here. The Wild Walk will bring a tremendous amount of attention to Tupper Lake, which will enhance an already impressive site. 

"Little Wolf Beach and campground is a great investment in promoting Tupper Lake and should be improved upon each year. The municipal golf course is a wonderful asset and also provides an exceptional cross-country ski area. 

"I acknowledge all the hard work and efforts put forth by the Adirondack Scenic Railroad and the Next Stop Tupper Lake teams. However, after many years of debate, reading loads of commentary, opinions, statistics and talking with parties from both sides and reviewing the Unit Management Plan for the corridor which runs through Tupper Lake, I believe it is time that we encourage the state to revert back to the item in the plan which allows for removal of the tracks and open the travel corridor up for tourism via hikers, bikers, walkers, and especially snowmobilers. 

"Tupper Lake is missing out on a huge part of winter tourism by not having easy access to get here. And bikers are travelling all over the Northeast to ride corridors. We need to reach out to and welcome those groups to our area in all aspects, and, in the end, we will begin to grow again. Tupper Lake is a great place to live, work and raise a family. I would hope to be part of the team that leads our town forward to achieve long-term economic stability and growth.”

TOWN COUNCIL 

(Vote for two, four-year term)

MICHAEL DECHENE

Party: Republican.

Age: 55.

Education: Tupper Lake High School.

Occupation: Landscaping business owner; retired from Federal Bureau of Prisons; former Town Highway Department employee.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake School District Board of Education, 11 years, six as president.

Civic organizations: Tupper Lake Country Club Board of Directors; Tupper Lake Lions Club; Tupper Lake Football Boosters; past member, St. Alphonsus Parish Council.

Family: Wife, Diane; two sons, Evan and Matthew.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“My platform is to work promoting Tupper Lake and the things we have here in our community. We have beautiful lakes and streams and hiking, cross-country skiing and a beautiful golf course. I want to promote Tupper Lake by marketing what we have here.

"I do support the Adirondack Club and Resort development, and I also support all economic development in our community.

"I would like to work together with the Town Council and Village Board of Trustees to promote the good things of Tupper Lake. Born and raised here all my life, I love Tupper Lake. It’s my home, and I am very passionate about it."

DON DEW JR.

Party: Republican, Conservative.

Age: 52.

Education: Bachelor's degree, Norwich University.

Occupation: Owner, Timber Lodge.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake Joint Planning Board, three years.

Civic organizations: Past president and board member Tupper Lake Chamber of Commerce; Tupper Lake Revitalization Committee; ARISE; volunteer administrative manager, Big Tupper Ski Area.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"First of all, as a community, we’re on the verge of so many great things and, now, it’s a matter of pushing them over the brink. Though tied in litigation, we have to continue to do what we can do as a community to support the Adirondack Club and Resort. I would continue to make sure we get to a point where we can put shovels in the ground.

"But resort development is certainly not all that we have. Other projects I hope to accomplish include developing a destination marketing plan for Tupper Lake, a document that we can use for outside investors as well as for tourism. I think we could have a component of a marketing plan that can be used to attract investors to Tupper Lake.

"A couple projects that I would like to see move forward include: a reuse plan for the Oval Wood Dish factory. I think we could get a lot more aggressive with a plan for that site. And we do have the Tupper Lake Industrial Park in place and shovel-ready. I’m not sure we are locally doing enough to promote that. These projects would be something to accomplish in concert with the Franklin County Industrial Development Agency. It’s about aggressive marketing — going after investment and getting these facilities occupied. Filling both would broaden the tax base and create jobs.

"I think the biggest thing in the next term is obviously taxes. Our current board has done a fairly decent job of maintaining taxes. We’ve had a recent revaluation; I’m thinking we could have been able to show some decrease in tax rates. I think we can possibly do a little bit better.

"The current board is looking at the sale of Setting Pole Dam, and I would support that transaction. We’ve got to make sure there is plan to maintain some control in keeping the water levels managed correctly.

"The other goal is in keeping revitalization moving forward: Revitalization on our waterfront has evolved through Little Loggers Playground, which today is under construction, and that means jobs. People here are working in Tupper Lake, and we’re right on the edge of creating a lot more of them."

JOHN L. QUINN

Party: Democrat; Independent, Maple Leaf.

Age: 58.

Education: Tupper Lake High School; associate degree, Paul Smith's College; bachelor's degree, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired from Adirondack Park Agency, 30 years as environmental programs specialist.

Previous government experience: Appointed to interim term, Tupper Lake Town Council; served two terms on Tupper Lake Central School District School Board.

Civic organizations: Previous member of Tupper Lake Rescue Squad, 20 years; Tupper Lake Lions Club; Tupper Lake Rod and Gun Club; volunteer, trail maintenance and grooming at Tupper Lake Cross-County Ski Center.

Family: Wife, Rita; daughter, Leah; son, Brendan.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I am now appointed to the council, filling an unexpired term. I would like to see the Town of Tupper Lake get more involved in promoting itself as a good place to live and work, encouraging new residents and businesses to locate in Tupper Lake while finding ways to keep our young people here by creating jobs.

"I would be remiss by not stating publicly that I stand for keeping taxes as low as possible and getting the most bang for our buck.

"I would also hope the Town Council would work closely with state elected officials to ensure Sunmount’s continued operation and maybe even expansion into providing different services. I think the town and village of Tupper Lake need to collaborate a bit more and create a promotion to draw people here. There are lots of places around Tupper Lake to create a hiking and paddling challenge unique to our community. Also, going forward, I do support the conversion of the railroad line to a recreational trail. I think its time has come, and we need to get behind that prospect of providing a multi-use trail in Tupper Lake."

SABRINA SABRE SHIPMAN

Party: Democrat.

Age: 37.

Education: Tupper Lake High School; courses at North Country Community College; former licensed real estate agent.

Occupation: Information technology specialist for New York state.

Previous government experience: Clerk, Tupper Lake Planning Board, two years.

Civic organizations: Former chair, Relay for Life in Tupper Lake; volunteer, Tupperpalooza; volunteer, Tupper Lake Tin Man.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"I have a lot of concerns with job loss potential at Sunmount due to state agency restructuring. My experience at Sunmount will be pro-active in supporting jobs at Sunmount.

"I would like to be more involved in the town's budget-planning process and in increasing the transparency of our town government."

TOWN COUNCIL

(Two-year seat)

KATHLEEN LEVEBVRE

Party: Democrat.

Age: 64.

Education: Bachelor's degree, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired, elementary school teacher.

Previous government experience: Town Council, eight years; deputy supervisor, two years; former trustee, North Country Community College, nine years.

Civic organizations: Tupper Lake Rotary Club, Tupper Lake Ecumenical Choir, Adirondack Public Observatory Education Committee.

Family: Husband, Dean; two sons, Dan and Paul.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

“I have closely followed the Adirondack Club and Resort Project for the last nine years and would like to be in office to see it finally begin.

"I also would like to continue to work to retain jobs at Sunmount DDSO and to possibly bring new jobs to our community.

"Tourism is a part of Tupper Lake’s economy, and I would like to work to make it even a bigger part by developing more snowmobile trails and cross-country ski trails for winter activities. That is why, in the 2014 town budget, I supported the purchase of a trail groomer for snowmobiling and the purchase of a mower to maintain the cross-country ski trails during the off season.

"I also support the railroad along with trails and will work to help provide more hiking and biking trails throughout the beautiful woodlands surrounding Tupper Lake.

"Finally, I hope to be able to continue to keep property-tax increases at a minimum as we’ve done again this year, with only a 3 cents per $1,000 overall tax increase, which translates to just a $3 total tax increase on a $100,000 home."

ERIC SHAHEEN

Party: Republican; Conservative.

Age: 45.

Education: Tupper Lake High School.

Occupation: Self-employed, general contractor.

Previous government experience: Tupper Lake Country Club Board, former president; Tupper Lake Planning Board.

Family: Wife, Briggette; sons, Lucas and Mason.

What do you hope to accomplish in the coming term if you’re elected?

"One of my biggest reasons for running is trying to change things here in Tupper Lake, try to get more business, more tourism, more economic development.

"I've lived here my whole life, and it just seems like we're going backwards. I'd like to see the town and village work together a little more closely to try to promote tourism here."

WAVERLY

TOWN COUNCIL

LAWRENCE CHENEY

Party: Democrat.

Age: 67.

Education: St. Regis Falls Central School.

Occupation: Retired line handler, St. Lawrence Seaway.

Military service: U.S. Army. 

Civic organizations: American Legion, Meals on Wheels.

Family: Wife, Sydna; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them? 

"One of our biggest problems is the amount of years that (derelict) buildings are going for back taxes. St. Lawrence County, every year they have (a tax auction) for the previous two years. Franklin County has historically been five, six, even as high as seven years. 

"When you go that long, the buildings are abandoned, and once a building is abandoned, it just becomes more run down. We have to try to get the (back taxes), and this is nothing I can accomplish as a board member, other than trying to have the town put a little more pressure on the county to try and hold a tax sale every year for the previous two years."

ERNEST WITKOWSKI

Party: Democrat, Unity.

Age: 65.

Education: Linton High School; bachelor's degree, master's degree and certificate of advanced study in administration, SUNY Plattsburgh.

Occupation: Retired, grade-school administrator.

Previous government experience: Town Council member since 2008.

Civic organizations: Association of Senior Citizens Board of Directors, St. Regis Falls Adult Center Board of Directors, vice president.

Family: Wife, Rebecca; two adult children.

What are the biggest issues affecting your community and how would you address them?

"We want to provide the basic services that our citizens need but also contain taxes. That's certainly one of our goals."

Howard "Butch" Goodrow: Did not return messages asking for information for this report.

OTHER RACES

Town supervisor: Michael Bailey (R, Shamrock).

Town clerk: Deborah Fraser (R, We The People).

Tax collector: Amy White (R). 

Highway superintendent: Harold ‘Jack’ Fraser (R, We The People).

WESTVILLE

Town supervisor: Rod Lauzon (D, Westville Party).

Town clerk: Ann Brady (D, Westville Party).

Town Council (vote for two): Michael Armstrong (D, Westville Party); Robert Reynolds (D, Westville Party).

Tax collector: Shirley Kelly (D, Westville Party).

Highway superintendent: Kevin Nichols (D, Westville Party).

Town justice: Darwin Fleury (D, Westville).

VILLAGE OF TUPPER LAKE

Mayor: Paul Maroun (R, D, C).

Village trustee (vote for two): Richard Donah (R, C, Independence Party); Leon Leblanc (R, C, Independence Party). 

Village justice (two-year unexpired term): Christopher Delair (R, C, Independence Party).hway superintendent: Harold ‘Jack’ Fraser (R, We The People).

WESTVILLE

Town supervisor: Rod Lauzon (D, Westville Party).

Town clerk: Ann Brady (D, Westville Party).

Town Council (vote for two): Michael Armstrong (D, Westville Party); Robert Reynolds (D, Westville Party).

Tax collector: Shirley Kelly (D, Westville Party).

Highway superintendent: Kevin Nichols (D, Westville Party).

Town justice: Darwin Fleury (D, Westville).

VILLAGE OF TUPPER LAKE

Mayor: Paul Maroun (R, D, C).

Village trustee (vote for two): Richard Donah (R, C, Independence Party); Leon Leblanc (R, C, Independence Party). 

Village justice (two-year unexpired term): Christopher Delair (R, C, Independence Party).