Press-Republican

Hagar

April 1, 2012

Time for pasture checkup

This is the time of year we look forward to all winter.

The unseasonably warm weather of last week melted the frost out of the ground and dried up the muddy surface. The grasses have started to green up and the coming April showers will give a quick boost to grow tall.

For most folks, that means mowing the lawn, a tedious weekly chore that must get done. For those of us with grazing animals, it means the end of feeding hay! You may be dreading start of lawn-mowing season, but believe me, there are many of us who love to watch the grass grow.

The early warm up offers livestock grazers a great opportunity to assess the pastures, fences and opportunities for this season. Often taken for granted, pasture is an important agricultural resource that many livestock farmers depend on for summer feed.

While many of our larger dairies no longer depend on grazing pasture for a significant part of their feeding program, pastures play a much more important role in raising livestock such as dairy heifers, beef cattle, sheep and goats.

A well-managed pasture can in fact provide excellent feed to growing livestock with little supplementation. But what is well-managed pasture?

Unfortunately, non-tillable, swampy, brushy or rocky fields that are poor in condition or fertility often end up as pasture. While they are probably not suitable for growing other crops, these types of lands also make very poor pastures. All too often, livestock are turned out into one big pasture for the summer and left to their own devices.

If a livestock owner's goal is to grow his animals in the quickest, most efficient way possible, this is unlikely to provide the nutrition needed.

A more modern view that has developed is that pasture should be seen as a perennial crop that deserves the same care and management as other crops on the farm. Pasture management can be complicated. Few other farming activities involve growing a crop, growing livestock and harvesting the crop all at the same time.

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