Press-Republican

FYI...

June 5, 2013

Father's Day gifts: Think outside the box

Father's Day falls on Sunday, June 16, and rather than going with the typical gifts of ties, socks and work shirts, try to get a little creative this year.

Digital tongs

How about going with the Admetior Digital BBQ Tongs and Thermometer for $29.99 on Amazon? Not only is it a great gift for the dad who loves to grill, but it'll make grilling a lot easier for him.

The tongs have a built-in instant read thermometer that gives you the meat's temperature in about five minutes. Plus, the temperatures of seven different kinds of meat are preset into the tongs, so an alarm goes off once the meat is cooked.

In addition, the tongs have an LED flashlight if dad wants to cook at night, and they measure temps up to 392 degrees Fahrenheit. 

The tongs are easy to clean too. Dad will just have to remove the digital screen and pop it into the dishwasher.

Bottle hat

If your father likes a cold beer while he's manning the grill, you may want to get him the Guinness Clover Bottle Opener Baseball Hat for $18.99.

That's right; while he's wearing the hat all he has to do is lift the bottle, put it to the hat's brim, insert the cap and pop open the bottle.

The Guinness hat comes in black, dark brown and olive green and has a Velcro strap, so one size fits all.

"The hat is great," wrote a customer who goes by the name of Flavia in an Amazon review.  "The bottle opener works perfectly. And the best part is: I'm in Sao Paulo, Brazil and the product arrived a week before the estimated time."

Golf glove

Then there's the SensoGlove for $89.95. It's a digital golf glove that has a built-in computer that provides feedback on how the club is being gripped.

As most golfers probably know already, the way you hold the golf club is of crucial importance, because if you hold it too tightly, it can take away from a smooth swing. If you hold it too loosely, you may not get enough power or worse, the club might fly out of your hands.

The creators of the SensoGlove say not only does the built-in computer provide visual feedback, it provides audio feedback as well, so it's almost like having a golf trainer on the course with dad while he's trying to perfect his swing.

But if you would rather buy a golf glove that's a little less expensive, you may want to go with the Golf Swing Glove by Protech Innovations Inc. It goes for about $35.

The Golf Swing Glove doesn't come with a built-in computer screen like the SensoGlove, but it does have a hinged-plate that keeps dad's hand and wrist in the right position, so he can get the most out of his swing.

And the company says the glove is made out of premium Cabretta leather, so it should be something dad can use for a long time.

Pill speakers

If you'd really like to wow dad this year, there's always the Beats by Dr. Dre Pill speakers for a little under $200.

The Beats by Dre headphones have been a hit with music lovers since they came on to the market, and the Pill speakers are known to work just as well and be just as powerful.

The Pill is small, being only 3.3 inches in length, but it's known to pack a serious musical wallop, just like Dre's headphones.

Another thing that's cool about the portable speakers is it allows dad to take phone calls while he's listening to his favorite tunes. And it runs on Bluetooth so no wires are necessary.

Portable speakers are trendy, as speakers like the Jambox and the Monster have been purchased by many.

But according to Internet reviews, the other speakers don't even come close to the Pill.

"I owned a Jambox and played around with the Monster, Jabra Solemate and others that are about this size and I'll have to say the Pill has them beat hands down in my opinion," wrote reviewer Aztec506 after he recently purchased the Pill.

Story provided by ConsumerAffairs.

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