Press-Republican

FYI...

October 15, 2013

Ouch! 10 athletes with bizarre injuries that had nothing to do with their sport

Getting hurt on the field is one thing. But pro athletes are just as prone to injuring themselves in unusual ways as the rest of us. Need proof? Here are 10 freakish instances where mind lost out to matter.

Clint Barmes

In 2005 Barmes, then a rookie shortstop with the Colorado Rockies, was sidelined for three months with a broken collarbone after he fell down a flight of stairs while carrying a package of deer meat given to him by teammate Todd Helton. Doctors inserted a titanium plate and nine screws to help the bone heal.

Adam Eaton

In his first full season with the San Diego Padres in 2001, Eaton suffered a bizarre injury when he accidentally stabbed himself in the stomach while trying to open a package of DVDs with a paring knife.

Chris Hanson

In 2003, Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio placed some wood and an ax in the team's locker room to inspire his players to "keep chopping wood" after an 0-3 start to the season. Hanson, taking Del Rio's message far too literally, gashed his right leg with the ax while trying to chop the wood, thus ending his season.

Gus Frerotte

In 1997, after scoring on a one-yard run late in the first half of a game against the New York Giants, the Redskins quarterback celebrated by head-butting a padded wall near the end zone. Frerotte suffered a sprained neck and was taken to a nearby hospital. Remarkably, he was able to play the following week.

Jeff Kent

An incident during spring training in 2002 left the Giants' star second baseman with a broken wrist. Kent initially claimed that he sustained the injury while washing his truck; however, subsequent media reports indicated that Kent hurt himself when he crashed his motorcycle while doing stunts on it -- in direct violation of his contract.

Brian Anderson

In 1998, while pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks, Anderson decided to test the temperature of an iron…by pressing it against his jaw. Yes, it was hot.

Bill Gramatica

While kicking for the Arizona Cardinals in 2001, Gramatica tore the ACL in his right leg while celebrating a 43-yard field goal. In the first quarter. Of a regular season game. He missed the rest of the season.

Lionel Simmons

During his rookie season with the Sacramento Kings in 1990-91, Simmons missed two games with tendinitis in his wrist, brought on by too much time spent playing his Nintendo Game Boy.

Tom Glavine

After a particularly disagreeable meal on a team flight in 1992, Glavine threw up so violently that he cracked two ribs and landed on the disabled list.

John Vanbiesbrouck

Following the 1988 season, Vanbiesbrouck -- an All-Star goaltender with the New York Rangers -- lacerated his ulnar nerve and three tendons when the glass table he was sitting on collapsed. He needed five hours of surgery to remove glass shards from his wrist and repair the damage. He recovered in time for the team's training camp three months later.

Sources: Wikipedia and media reports

Text Only | Photo Reprints
FYI...
  • 130408_NT_BEA_good kids We're raising a generation of timid kids

    A week ago, a woman was charged with leaving her child in the car while she went into a store. Her 11-year-old child. This week, a woman was arrested for allowing her 9-year-old daughter to go to the park alone. Which raises just one question: America, what the heck is wrong with you?

    July 31, 2014 1 Photo

  • 20110929_bowling.jpg Why fewer people go bowling

    Like other industries facing tough economic times, America's bowling centers are trying to reinvent themselves.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • mama.jpg What we get wrong about millennials living at home

    If the media is to be believed, America is facing a major crisis. "Kids," some age 25, 26, or even 30 years old, are living out of their childhood bedrooms and basements at alarmingly high numbers. The hand-wringing overlooks one problem: It's all overblown.

    July 29, 2014 1 Photo

  • Your chocolate addiction is only going to get more expensive

    For nearly two years, cocoa prices have been on the rise. Finally, that's affecting the price you pay for a bar of chocolate - and there's reason to believe it's only the beginning.

    July 28, 2014

  • Facebook tests button to let people shop from its website

    Members on desktop computers or mobile devices can click a "buy" button to make purchases through advertisements or other posts on the world's largest social network, the Menlo Park, California-based company said Thursday in a blog post.

    July 27, 2014

  • Wal-Mart to cut prices more aggressively in back-to-school push

    Wal-Mart Stores plans to cut prices more aggressively during this year's back-to-school season and will add inventory to its online store as the chain battles retailers for student spending.

    July 26, 2014

  • An oncologist uses scorpion venom to locate cancer cells

    Olson, a pediatric oncologist and research scientist in Seattle, has developed a compound he calls Tumor Paint. When injected into a cancer patient, it seems to light up all the malignant cells so surgeons can easily locate and excise them.

    July 25, 2014

  • An alternative diagnosis to ADHD: Schoolchildren need more time to move

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tells us that in recent years, there has been a jump in the percentage of young people diagnosed with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, commonly known as ADHD: 7.8 percent in 2003 to 9.5 percent in 2007 to 11 percent in 2011.

    July 24, 2014

  • Hospitals let patients schedule ER visits

    Three times within a week, 34-year-old Michael Granillo went to the emergency room at Northridge Hospital Medical Center in Los Angeles because of intense back pain. Each time, Granillo, who didn't have insurance, stayed for less than an hour before leaving without being seen by a doctor.

    July 23, 2014

  • Why it's basically impossible to delete those naked selfies you text

    If you're selling an old Android smartphone on an online auction site, you could be giving away rather more than you intend to, according to a recent investigation by anti-malware company Avast.

    July 21, 2014