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January 4, 2013

Today in History

Today is Friday, Jan. 4, the fourth day of 2013. There are 361 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Jan. 4, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered his State of the Union address in which he outlined the goals of his "Great Society," a series of domestic policy initiatives aimed at growing the economy and improving the quality of life for all.

On this date:

  • In 1821, the first native-born American saint, Elizabeth Ann Seton, died in Emmitsburg, Md.
  • In 1896, Utah was admitted as the 45th state.
  • In 1904, the Supreme Court, in Gonzalez v. Williams, ruled that Puerto Ricans were not aliens and could enter the United States freely; however, the court stopped short of declaring them U.S. citizens.
  • In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in his State of the Union address, called for legislation to provide assistance for the jobless, elderly, impoverished children and the handicapped.
  • In 1943, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin appeared on the cover of Time as the magazine's 1942 "Man of the Year."
  • In 1951, during the Korean War, North Korean and Communist Chinese forces recaptured the city of Seoul (sohl).
  • In 1960, author and philosopher Albert Camus (al-BEHR' kah-MOO') died in an automobile accident in Villeblevin, France, at age 46.
  • In 1964, Pope Paul VI began a visit to the Holy Land, the first papal pilgrimage of its kind, as he arrived in Jerusalem.
  • In 1974, President Richard M. Nixon refused to hand over tape recordings and documents subpoenaed by the Senate Watergate Committee.
  • In 1987, 16 people were killed when an Amtrak train bound from Washington, D.C., to Boston collided with Conrail locomotives that had crossed into its path from a side track in Chase, Md.
  • In 1990, Charles Stuart, who'd claimed he'd been wounded and that his pregnant wife was fatally shot by a robber, leapt to his death off a Boston bridge after he himself became a suspect.
  • In 2007, Nancy Pelosi was elected the first female speaker of the House as Democrats took control of Congress.

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