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PPR patent color 0716

P-R Photo/Julie Robinson Robard This array of patent medicine bottles was accumulated in a backwoods dump behind the farmhouse in Maine where columnist Julie Robinson Robards grew up. They are Atwoods Jaundice Bitters, which was 16 percent alcohol and recommended for jaundice, headache, dyspepsia, worms, dizziness, loss of appetite, darting pains, cold and fevers as well as cleansing the blood of humors and moistening the skin; St. Jacobs Oil -- The Greatest German Remedy, which originated in London and was made in Baltimore by 1897; Fellows Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites, concocted by Englishman James Fellows and sold in America from 1871; Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine; and Carter's Extract of Smartweed, an opium-laced herbal formula. The small pill containers include Dr. Means Pills, Stewarts Dyspepsia Tablets, Olive Tablets and Doans Ointment. All medicines promised sure relief from various ailments. Doan's Ointment and Olive Tablets are still on the market today.