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July 11, 2013

Today in History

Today is Thursday, July 11, the 192nd day of 2013. There are 173 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On July 11, 1533, Pope Clement VII issued a bull of excommunication against England's King Henry VIII for the annulment of the king's marriage to Catherine of Aragon and subsequent marriage to second wife Anne Boleyn.

On this date:

  • In 1767, John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the United States, was born in Braintree, Mass.
  • In 1798, the U.S. Marine Corps was formally re-established by a congressional act that also created the U.S. Marine Band.
  • In 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr mortally wounded former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton during a pistol duel in Weehawken, N.J.
  • In 1859, Big Ben, the great bell inside the famous London clock tower, chimed for the first time.
  • In 1922, the Hollywood Bowl officially opened with a program called "Symphonies Under the Stars" with Alfred Hertz conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
  • In 1937, American composer and pianist George Gershwin died at a Los Angeles hospital of a brain tumor; he was 38.
  • In 1952, the Republican national convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower for president and Richard M. Nixon for vice president.
  • In 1960, the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee was first published by J.B. Lippincott and Co.
  • In 1973, a Varig 707 from Brazil made an emergency crash-landing outside Paris after fire broke out on board, sending smoke into the cabin; 123 of the 134 people on board perished.
  • In 1979, the abandoned U.S. space station Skylab made a spectacular return to Earth, burning up in the atmosphere and showering debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia.
  • In 1988, nine people were killed when suspected Palestinian gunmen attacked hundreds of tourists aboard a Greek cruise ship, the City of Poros, which was steaming toward a marina in suburban Athens.
  • In 1995, the U.N.-designated "safe haven" of Srebrenica (SREH'-breh-neet-sah) in Bosnia-Herzegovina fell to Bosnian Serb forces, who then carried out the killings of 8,000 Muslim men and boys.

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