Press-Republican

Gast

July 28, 2013

Enjoy some fun at the fair

I’ve heard it said, “You can’t call yourself a local until you’ve been to the Franklin County Fair.” It’s the area’s longest running tradition and one of the oldest in New York State.

The 163rd fair is about to get into full swing. This year’s events include concerts, truck and tractor pulls, a demolition derby, harness racing, a stunt drivers thrill show, a bronco and bull riding rodeo and the Franklin County Has Talent competition.

There will be a midway full of rides, games and attractions, and a wide variety of commercial exhibits and concessions. But it’s much more than carnival rides, music, fried dough, French fries and winning brightly colored stuffed animals.

It was originally the Franklin County Agricultural Society because of its agricultural focus. The name is still presented over the front gate on Route 11 on the east side of Malone, and the price of admission still includes access to all agricultural events. These displays, presentations and competitions bring to light the rich and diverse agricultural heritage of Franklin County and provide an opportunity to view working farm animals, livestock competitions, and many of the time-honored traditions.

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE), Franklin County 4-H youth, the livestock animals and the traditional lineup of 4-H activities have been part of the fair for as long as most 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA) families can remember. The Franklin County Fair Board has upheld a tradition of support.

The fair is not part of the 4-H program and CCE and the Fair Board are not directly related. Still, both have been cooperating for generations to assure success at one of the largest fairs in the region. It continues to be a place where 4-H members and others can come together to exhibit their skills, craftsmanship, showmanship and animals, and it remains a showcase for 4-H and FFA members exhibiting their prize livestock, as well as their garden, home-economics and crafts projects. On display are homegrown and handmade items of all kinds; fruits and vegetables, artwork, photography and a variety of creative projects, each one sporting a ribbon.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Gast
  • Gast_Richard.jpg Maple sugaring season is underway

    Climate change has generally pushed back the season, but this year has been an exception, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    April 6, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Seed-starting workshop offered

    Cooperative Extension offers everything you will need to start a successful garden from scratch, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    March 23, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Addiction to energy has costs

    Damage to environment, climate change just two of the problems caused by runaway energy consumption, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    March 9, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Timber management has many benefits

    The use of applicable timber-management practices can help deer survive the winter, according to columnist Richard Gast

    February 23, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Flower life can be extended

    That Valentine bouquet doesn't have to be a fleeting memory, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    February 9, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Learn to deal with hypothermia, frostbite

    Prevention is best, but knowing how to treat injuries is also critical this time of year, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    January 26, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Maple School to be held

    Franklin County event will features classes on a variety of topics, maple equipment sales and more, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    January 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Kisses under mistletoe have ancient origins

    While it is unclear exactly which tradition started the Christmas practice, mistletoe has long held a place in ancient lore, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    December 29, 2013 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Moose returning to New York

    While other areas have experienced declines, the lack of certain parasites has helped boost local populations, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    December 15, 2013 1 Photo

  • Gast_Richard.jpg Native horticulturalist rescued Pilgrims

    Colony may not have survived without the expertise of a key Native American ally, according to columnist Richard Gast.

    December 1, 2013 1 Photo

Videos: Editor Picks