Press-Republican

Lookback

October 8, 2012

Lookback: Oct. 8 to 14

25 YEARS — 1987

▶ Moose are moving back into the North Country in increasing numbers: if 15 to 20 qualifies as increasing. But 20 Moose is 20 more than the area has seen for more than 100 years.

▶ With volunteer labor and creative fundraising, the city will build Verdantique Park despite the shortfall in matching state money. The state awarded Plattsburgh a share of the environmental bond act: $400,000 over two years.

▶ Clinton County’s future may include better airport, public bus and ferry services, but it’s local transportation improvements in the year 2012 won’t feature a rooftop Highway or bridge between Plattsburgh and Vermont. An interstate highway between Watertown and Plattsburgh would cost a “staggering” amount of money, according to the state Department of Transportation’s regional planning engineer.

50 YEARS — 1962

▶ The Plattsburgh Housing Authority is planning to build a $1.5 million, 100 unit housing colony for low income families and elderly persons. The authority now envisions the new colony as providing housing for 60 low income families and 40 units for elderly persons.

▶ The William H. Miner Research Institute has been quietly enlarging the scope of what administrator Edward Czarnetzky calls “our secondary function;” the broadening of the Institute’s ability to help area agriculturists. “Let’s face it,” Czarnetzky said. “Normal farming in this area is not exactly booming.”

▶ The city’s master-planners think Plattsburgh ought to put its water service on a paying basis, the same as its electrical service. For $20,000 the new master plan says, the city could provide meters for all water users, most of whom already have them.

75 YEARS — 1937

▶ The 26th infantry returned recently to Plattsburgh barracks after months of maneuvers. Since August, units of the 26th Infantry have been on various duties which have separated them from one another, and from their home station Plattsburgh.

▶ Tightening up of Northern New York’s milk strike was regarded as a certainty yesterday following announcements by officials of the Dairy Farmers Union of four meetings to be held in the immediate future. The meetings are expected to result in efforts to determine the exact strength of the dairy farmers Union in it’s fight with the Sheffield Condensed Milk Company.

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