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February 6, 2011

Fossil fuel dependence affecting climate change

I don't know about you, but I just love oil. As a matter of fact I am addicted to it and cheap energy, and I am not the only one, and that's the problem. NASA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), has reported that 2010 was tied statistically with 2005 for the hottest year on record, and these records date back to 1880.

Hmmm: is there a connection with fossil fuel consumption and warming temperatures?

According to NOAA scientists temperatures last year were "1.34 degrees F warmer than the average global surface temperature from 1951 to 1980," and 2010 marked "the 34th consecutive year with global temperatures above the 20th century average." Additionally, this warming occurred even when the Sun was in the deepest solar minimum in nearly a century and La Nina, which normally causes a cooling trend, was present for half the year.

The 'Global Surface Temperatures' graph copied here, courtesy of NASA's Goddard Institute of Space Studies (GISS), shows more global warming datasets. The chart gives data from GISS, the Met Office Hadley Center/Climate Research Unit (CRU) in the United Kingdom, NOAA's NCDC, and the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA). The data sets are from three different continents and are in close agreement. To see the original chart in color and in more detail go to www.giss.nasa.gov/research .

In a preliminary report the JMA said that 2010 had the second highest average global temperature "since comparable data became available in 1891." "The agency attributed the rise in the average temperature to global warming caused by emissions of greenhouse gases and a rise in sea surface temperatures caused by El Nino..." See www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/average- .

The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has also reported in. According to statistics from the FMI,"the first decade of the 21st century was the warmest decade in Finland's recorded history, where records were taken all the way back to the 1840s." The previous warmest decade for Finland was the 1930s.

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