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April 15, 2012

Starting a small farm takes planning

I visited with a small farmer last week who had a whole menagerie of livestock on his place; cows, goats, chickens and who knows what else.

He had accumulated his livestock over time as his family's interests had evolved and he enjoyed the variety. As is often the case with small farms, family members play a large part in determining the mix of agricultural activities.

Caring for small livestock is a great way to teach young children responsibility and start educating them about animal science and the facts of life. I also encounter many folks who move to the country to reconnect with nature and live a simpler life.

Many often have a family farm that has remained in the family and would like to make it productive once again. Because many of these folks have been away from farming for most of their lives, they are often interested in learning how to improve their chances of success.

Small farming is by and large an endeavor that is started to improve a family's quality of life; not necessarily to produce income, but to live a more sustainable and fulfilling lifestyle.

Often someone buys a home in a rural area that includes some acreage and raising some livestock and vegetables fulfils an idealistic dream of becoming a farmer. However, some thought on how to make good decisions and choices is important. Farming is hard work whether it is small or large scale, and like any endeavor, should be given a great deal of thought prior to jumping right in.

While enthusiastic optimism is a good quality to have, there is no substitute for planning on your path to success.

The first step in starting a small farm should be to evaluate your resources. The environment, the land and your existing facilities will have a large impact on your ability to produce crops or livestock. Many times, if the land that has been abandoned as farmland or is being sold for housing, it has been done so for reasons that may limit its agricultural value.

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