Press-Republican

Columns

December 8, 2012

Concerned about elderly neighbor's puppy

Dear Dog Lady,

I worry about the puppy, Blarney, that lives next door. He belongs to an elderly woman who would otherwise live alone. This dog never gets out for a walk. His leash is hooked on at the top of the stairs, and there is barely enough rope for him to get all the way down the stairs. The dog is approximately 1 year old and has never been bathed, groomed or on a vet visit. I want to help this puppy, but I’m not sure of the best way to approach the situation. Please help. —Concerned Neighbor

A: Gather your courage and have a little chat with the elderly woman about Blarney’s care. Express your worry in a comforting tone. Offer to take the dog out for a walk. See how the woman reacts to your kindness. She needs a helping hand. She might also be grateful. Having this puppy is probably too much for her.

Dog Lady feels hopeful for Blarney because the dog has you, a concerned guardian angel neighbor. You might offer to put the woman in touch with a humane society or shelter. Maybe you could engineer a switch and rescue the puppy while finding an older, calmer shelter dog for your neighbor. All this sounds like a lot of volunteer work on your part, but, if your efforts are successful, the rewards will be great for all concerned — especially Blarney.

Dear Dog Lady,

Because of my neighbor and his dog Cassius, I was eager to close up our summer home and move back to our regular place. Cassius is a Portuguese water dog and unfixed. My neighbor keeps the dog expertly groomed and shaved. I once asked about the haircut, and he explained the breed has a modified poodle cut. The backside is bald and so are the hind legs and nearly the whole tail. Having to look at Cassius’s shaved testicles is not pretty. I feel the neighbor parades his dog to show off the manhood. I wonder if this is why he has not gotten his dog neutered. I talked with my wife about this, and she suggested I write you. What do you think? —David

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