Press-Republican

Columns

October 8, 2012

Try 'freekeh' for change of taste at dinner table

(Continued)

I personally prefer the mill’s Organic Freekeh Mix, which includes not only freekeh but rye, basmati rice and emmer. What is emmer, you ask? It’s another species of ancient wheat grown around the world and now in New York. The freekeh mix is a delicious, chewy, nutty side dish, and it cooks faster than plain brown rice. It’s kind of like bulgur wheat, if you’ve ever tried that. And you can substitute freekeh or the mix in recipes that call for rice or bulgur; it’s a nice change of pace.

The other day my son brought home yet another of the innumerable and inevitable class-fundraiser packets, and I groaned at the thought of imposing more sales on my coworkers. However, I was delighted to see that this fundraiser was for whole grains and flours from Champlain Valley Milling. What a refreshing change from the standard fundraiser. I would encourage other schools to take advantage of this healthy sales opportunity.

Most of the milled grains produced by Champlain Valley Milling are distributed in the Northeastern United States, and luckily for us, the North County Cooperative on Bridge Street in Plattsburgh carries many of the mill’s products. The cooperative also carries local flour produced by North Country Farms, just across the Adirondacks in Watertown. So support our Adirondack farms by purchasing local grains, and enjoy another taste of the North Country. 

Laurie Davis is an educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension in Essex County and is the coordinator for Adirondack Harvest. Reach her at 962-4810, Ext. 404, or by email: lsd22@cornell.edu. Visit www.adirondackharvest.com to search for local foods and farms.

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