Press-Republican

Columns

October 4, 2013

Ambassadors to Canada

Bruce Heyman will be the 30th U.S. ambassador to Canada —when the Senate gets around to confirming his nomination.

Heyman, a Chicago businessman and fundraiser for Barack Obama, succeeds Chicago lawyer and Obama bagman David Jacobson, who left Ottawa in July after his four-year stint.

It’s worth noting that Jacobson’s final official visit of his posting outside Ottawa was to Quebec City, where he went to the Citadelle military fortress to thank Canadian troops for their role in Afghanistan.

Coincidentally, it was at the Citadelle in May 1939 that an earlier U.S. envoy to Canada Daniel Calhoun Roper had personally presented his credentials to none other than King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. The royal couple was on the first stop of a month-long tour of Canada and the United States ostensibly to drum up support for Great Britain as war with Nazi Germany loomed.

A fictionalized version of this royal visit features in the film “Hyde Park on Hudson,” starring Bill Murray and Laura Linney, as President Franklin Roosevelt and his lover-cousin Daisy.

Oddly enough, another Roosevelt cousin, career diplomat Warren Delano Robbins, served for two years in Ottawa. He may have caught a bad cold in the northern capital, as he died of pneumonia shortly after he quit the posting in March 1935.

Roper didn’t stay long in Ottawa either, feeling a need to return to Washington as dark clouds in Europe gathered. As it turned out he left Canada two weeks before England declared war on Germany on Sept. 3, 1939.

Roper’s replacement was James “Jimmy” Cromwell, an ardent supporter of FDR who was, as his biography notes, “connected to three of the greatest fortunes in America through two of his marriages and one of his mother’s.”

His widowed mother, Lucretia, met on an ocean cruise and married E. T. Stotesbury, a railroad financier and associate of J. P. Morgan. Cromwell’s first marriage was to an heiress of the automotive Dodge dollars, and his second to one 22-year-old Doris Duke, once known as “the richest girl in the world,” thanks to her father’s tobacco fortune.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Columns
  • Terry_Mattingly.jpg Easter with doubters and the 'nones'

    Should more pastors ask this blunt question: "Do you really believe Jesus was raised from the dead?" wonders religion columnist Terry Mattingly.

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • Black_Peter_2014_cropped.jpg Canadiens are Canada's team

    The National Hockey League playoffs are underway, and for Canadiens fans, many of whom likely reside in the Montreal "suburb" of Plattsburgh, it is a time of hope and joy.

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • little_mug.jpg There's no saw like an old saw Kaye and I laughed ourselves silly the other day as we tried to top each other with our own sayings from childhood, columnist Gordie Little writes.

    April 13, 2014 1 Photo

  • Denenberg_Stu1.jpg Privacy concerns make a comeback

    There's a growing concern amongst the millennials, columnist Stu Denenberg writes.

    April 13, 2014 1 Photo

  • paul_grasso.jpg Several options exist for downtown

    Pedestrian mall just one idea that could be good for city's economic future, according to columnist Paul Grasso.

    April 13, 2014 1 Photo

  • colin_read.jpg Government can't create success on its own

    It takes a grass-roots community effort of people working together to assure future accomplishment, according to columnist Colin Read.

    April 13, 2014 1 Photo

  • Hagar_mug1.jpg Farmers strive for sustainability

    Conserving the land and assuring long-term profitability are two of the key goals for farmers these days, according to columnist Peter Hagar.

    April 13, 2014 1 Photo

  • Black_Peter_2014_cropped.jpg Big shift in Quebec vote

    Being a man of science, Philippe Couillard, premier-designate of Quebec, chose to use a geological term (though his field is actually medicine) to describe what happened in Monday's election, writes Canadian columnist Peter Black.

    April 11, 2014 1 Photo

  • Terry_Mattingly.jpg A monastery in the Hebrides, after 1,000 years

    Before Father Seraphim Aldea can build a monastery on Scotland's Mull Island, he needs to have a working septic system, writes religion columnist Terry Mattingly.

    April 11, 2014 1 Photo

  • Tobias_Sue_012914.jpg Old movies offer more than entertaining TV

    Columnist Susan Tobias and her husband, Toby, are reminded of simple childhood memories while watching an old black-and-white movie.

    April 9, 2014 1 Photo

Peter Black: Canadian Dispatch

Lois Clermont, Editor

Cornell Cooperative Extension
Richard Gast: Cornell Ag Extension

Bob Grady

Guest Columns
Peter Hagar: Cornell Ag Connection

Health Advice

Ray Johnson: Climate Science
Gordie Little: Small Talk

Terry Mattingly: On Religion

Steve Ouellette: You Had To Ask

Colin Read: Everybody's Business

Pinch of Time