Press-Republican

Columns

June 19, 2011

Farmers markets open for season

When you shop at the farmers market, everybody wins.

As a customer, you get to select from the finest, the freshest and the best local produce and prepared foods that money can buy. You'll find a terrific variety of freshly picked vegetables and fruits, homemade baked goods, locally prepared, pickled, brewed and smoked goods, and much, much more.

You can meet and visit with the growers, ask questions and get closer to the sources of locally grown and prepared wholesome, nutritious food. What's more, you can be confident and feel good about buying home-grown food from your neighbors. Hey, it's fun to talk to the folks that grow it! And they'll appreciate your feedback.

In an age of global markets, it is all too easy to see how local towns and communities can easily lose touch with the efforts and the productivity of area farmers and growers. By shopping at the farmers market, you support local growers and the productive use of our land and water. And you help support the preservation of agricultural land and the knowledge of our agricultural heritage for future generations. What's more, when you shop at the farmers market, you help strengthen our rural economy.

Besides, locally grown and prepared foods tastes better and are more nutritious than fruits and vegetables that are picked before they're ripe and then transported across the continent or halfway around the world.

The tradition of farmers markets can be traced back to ancient times. Farmers Markets were the centers of villages and towns. They were not only places where people gathered to buy, barter and trade goods and services, but places where people met to exchange news and share stories with one another as well. Many parts of the world have a tradition of farmers markets going back many centuries.

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