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In My Opinion

June 18, 2013

In My Opinion: SUNY set to move plan forward

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Tax-Free NY proposal to allow new businesses to operate tax free on SUNY campuses opens up new and exciting paths of opportunity for New York.

As Chancellor Zimpher stated, “the governor has said many times that SUNY is the economic engine for New York, and these new tax-free zones will further our campus’s ability to innovate, create jobs, and attract new companies through public private partnerships.”

The scope, scale and diversity of SUNY’s unmatched assets are in complete alignment with the governor’s vision.

SUNY’s 17 business incubators have produced more than 2,100 jobs; its six Centers for Advance Technology have contributed $2.2 billion to New York’s economy over the past decade; its eight Centers of Excellence have produced $1 billion in private-sector investment.

The North Country is ready for an infusion of new ideas and new opportunities. SUNY Plattsburgh, SUNY Potsdam, SUNY Canton and Clinton, Jefferson and North Country community colleges attract millions of dollars of research funds in the areas of teacher education, tourism, environmental studies, computer science, small-business development, public safety and other areas.

Tax-Free NY advances this capacity further to produce jobs and drive innovation, economic development and entrepreneurial opportunity.

SUNY and its Research Foundation are in complete alignment with Tax-Free NY. Targeted programs are at work growing research, stimulating innovation and creating jobs for New York state.

SUNY’s Technology Accelerator Fund has provided over $1 million to support the advancement of SUNY technologies from the lab to the marketplace, and an Entrepreneur in Residence Program supports campuses with the time and skills of proven, private-sector entrepreneurs who lend their startup experience and expertise to a new generation of New York business people.

SUNY’s STEM research grant program prepares SUNY students for rewarding, high-paying professions that meet New York’s 21st century workforce demands.

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In My Opinion