Press-Republican

Briefs

January 27, 2013

Business briefs: Jan. 27, 2013

(Continued)

It is co-sponsored by Behavioral Health Services North (BHSN) and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI): Champlain Valley.

A program will be held Thursday, Feb. 7, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. titled Health Homes: What Are They? It will include panelists Mary Baker, care management, BHSN; Colleen Florio, AHI; and

Sherri Gillette, director, Clinton County Community Services Board. It will be held at the Plattsburgh Public Library, 19 Oak St., in Plattsburgh, in the Second Floor Meeting Room.

Attendees are invited to come to one or all the programs in the series and may bring a lunch. Resource materials will be provided.

Upcoming First Thursday sessions include March 7, Transgender Teens; and April 4, Autism: Ask Your Questions.

For more information, call BHSN at 563-8206, Ext. 135, email bblack@bhsn.org, or visit www.bhsn.org.

NAMI can be reached at 561-2685 or email namicv@aol.com.

Named to panel

PLATTSBURGH — The Institute of Medicine has selected an Excellus BlueCross BlueShield physician to serve on a committee of national experts charged with helping to transform the nation’s end-of-life care.

Patricia Bomba, M.D., vice president and medical director, geriatrics, Excellus BCBS, will serve on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Transforming End-of-Life Care.

Bomba is a nationally recognized palliative care and end-of-life expert who designs and oversees the implementation of community projects throughout New York state. At Excellus BCBS, Bomba serves as a geriatric consultant on projects and programs affecting seniors.

“New York state is ahead of the curve when it comes to ensuring patients’ wishes are honored at the end of life,” Bomba said. “I hope to parlay the successes of New York state into a new national standard that empowers patients, their families and physicians to make and share sound decisions.”

Bomba was the driving force behind a 2008 New York state Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) law which helped to ensure that a person’s end-of-life wishes were followed, whether the person was at home, in a nursing home or in any other non-hospital setting.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Briefs