Press-Republican

Briefs

July 13, 2014

Farm briefs: July 13, 2014

Grower field meeting, picnic to be held

WILLSBORO — Cornell Cooperative Extension is sponsoring a grower field meeting and picnic supper on Monday, July 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Cornell Research Farm in Willsboro.

Growers are invited to tour and discuss the horticulture research projects on the farm including season extension, non-traditional high-tunnel crops, inter-row cover crops, reduced zone tillage, Juneberries, cold-hardy wine grapes, leek moth and more. Guest speakers include Judson Reid, Cornell Vegetable Program; Anu Rangarajan, Cornell Small Farms Program; Masanori Seto, Geneva Experiment Station; Mike Davis, Willsboro farm manager; and Amy Ivy, ENY Commercial Horticulture Program.

The program is free and open to the public and includes a light supper. Registration is required by July 25 to ensure enough food.

To register or for more information, contact Ivy at adi2@cornell.edu or 561-7450 (office) or 570-5991(cell).

The event is funded in part by the Northern New York Agriculture Development Program, www.nnyagdev.org. 

Research enhances precision nitrogen management

PLATTSBURGH — The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program (NNYADP) and the Cornell University Crop and Soil Sciences and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences departments have released the results of their latest efforts to enhance real-time weather-based precision nitrogen (N) management in New York state’s northernmost counties. The most recent report summarizing 2011-13 field trial data is posted at www.nnyagdev.org.

Based in part on 18 years of field studies in Northern New York, the van Es Lab at Cornell University developed the Adapt-N data-driven simulation software to help reduce uncertainty about optimum nitrogen application rates, particularly driven by early-season variable weather conditions. 

“Nitrogen management on corn silage and grain acres can be costly when the nutrient is overapplied without any gain in crop yield. The dynamic recommendations of Adapt-N can reduce overall inputs, cost and environmental losses,” said Cornell Crop and Soil Sciences Professor Dr. Harold van Es. 

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Briefs
Videos: Editor Picks
US Trying to Verify Video of American's Killing FBI Director Addresses Ferguson Shooting in Utah Raw: Police at Scene of St. Louis Shooting Police: 2 Calif. Boys Planned School Shooting NOLA Police Chief Retires Amid Violent Crimes Lunch Bus Delivers Meals to Kids Out of School Water Bottles Recalled for Safety Researcher Testing On-Field Concussion Scanners Rockets Fired From Gaza, in Breach of Ceasefire Raw: Japanese Military Live Fire Exercise Police, Protesters Clash in Ferguson Independent Autopsy Reveals Michael Brown Wounds Nashville Embraces Motley Crue Obama: 'Time to Listen, Not Just Shout' Lawyer: Gov. Perry Indictment a 'Nasty Attack' Raw: Russian Aid Convoy Crosses Into Ukraine Iowa Man Builds Statue of a Golfer Out of Balls Assange Gets Cryptic About Leaving Embassy in UK Raw: Building Collapse in South Africa, 9 Dead Raw: Pope Francis Meets 'Comfort Women'
CVPH Job Opportunities