Press-Republican

Briefs

December 15, 2013

Farm briefs: Dec. 15, 2013

Dairy Institute class focuses on mastitis

MALONE — Reducing incidents of mastitis in dairy herds through the use of record keeping is the focus of the Northern New York Dairy Institute January 2014 classes organized by the Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Northern New York and Quality Milk Production Services (QMPS).

The class will cover record keeping for mastitis control, the importance of knowing the different strains of mastitis for selecting proper treatment, and the value of records for identifying problem cows and what mastitis may be costing the farm.

Speakers include veterinarian Dr. Jessica Scillieri Smith of the Quality Milk Lab at Canton, George Cudoc with Dairy One’s Dairy Management Resources Division, Northern New York Regional Dairy Specialist Dr. Kimberly Morrill and New York State veterinarians.

The cost is $35 by pre-registration or $50 at the door for the 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. class. It will be of interest to dairies of all types wanting to improve opportunities for quality milk production premium income. FSA borrower credits are available.

The class will be offered Jan. 15 at Mo’s Pub and Grill in Malone.

The pre-registration deadline is two weeks prior to the class session. To register, contact Northern New York Regional Dairy Specialist Kimberley Morrill at 564-0498 or 315-379-9192, kmm434@cornell.edu.

Cutoff date for conservation program nearing

MALONE — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is opening the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) for new enrollments for federal fiscal year 2014. While local NRCS offices accept applications year-round, NRCS evaluates applications during specific, announced ranking periods. To be considered for the current enrollment, producers must have their applications submitted by Jan. 17, 2014.

“CSP is different than our other financial-assistance programs,” said NRCS State Conservationist Don Pettit. “It offers payments to producers who maintain a high level of conservation on their land and agree to adopt higher levels of stewardship. It helps to ensure that their farms are more productive and sustainable in the future.”

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Briefs
Videos: Editor Picks
CVPH Job Opportunities