Press-Republican

Business

August 30, 2013

Lewis Heights delayed again

PLATTSBURGH — Plans for Lewis Heights, an 88-unit apartment complex on the former Plattsburgh Air Force Base, have been delayed for at least another month.

Local developer James Latinville wants to build the one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments on the former Air Force Base Hospital property on New York Road.

PLAN DETAILS NEEDED

The City Planning Board tabled the Final Planned Unit Development Review at its meeting Monday night, citing a lack of finalized plans for the floor, building elevation, storm-water management and utilities.

Latinville told the Press-Republican the next day that he plans to be back before the Planning Board at its September meeting with all the information requested.

“I hope to begin the construction planning process as soon as possible to start construction in the spring,” he said.

One of his first actions will be to dress up the perimeter of the property to bring its appearance more in line with neighboring residential properties, he said.

FOUR PHASES

This was project’s fourth appearance before the Planning Board, although the first was only to provide information and receive public feedback.

Several neighbors expressed concerns about the size of the project at the first meeting but have not voiced concerns at any of the subsequent meetings.

The project would be built in four phases, driven by demand. The four buildings would feature two walkways that allow them to be considered two buildings.

GARAGES MOVED

At the June meeting, the sketch plan for the project was approved after it had been tabled in May. One of the changes at that time was inclusion of 50 garages, to be included in leases on a first-come, first-served basis.

Some of those garages have now been moved to the perimeter of the property to provide additional shielding for neighbors.

Aaron Ovios of Robert M. Sutherland PC, the project’s engineering firm, said they planned 20-foot light poles for the parking area. Planning Board Chairman Joseph Rotella said he would prefer the light poles be no more than 18 feet tall.

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