Press-Republican

Business

November 19, 2012

Keeseville lights up Front Street

KEESEVILLE — Spirits were high here Saturday afternoon for a community tree-lighting and market event — the first time that Front Street in the village has been decorated for the holidays in at least three years, according to organizers.

“It was fun to see the number of folks that turned out to see it,” said Deborah Mills, co-chair of the “Let’s Light up Keeseville” event. “It looks really festive. The LEDs cast a bluish tint that really looks nice.”

Starting at 2 p.m., the group held a farmers and crafters market on Front Street until 5 p.m. when it was dark enough to light the trees lining Front Street and those in Veteran’s Park.

For the many who turned out, there was a positive energy about the village’s future potential for revitalization efforts. But amid the merriment is a elephant in the room: The possibility that come January, the village could cease to exist as a separate municipality.

With a dissolution referendum set for Jan. 22, time may be running out for the village of Keeseville to come together and rebuild. If the result of the vote is to dissolve Keeseville, the village would cease to exist as a municipal unit on Dec. 31, 2014.

And while there were many village residents willing to talk about revitalization and bringing Keeseville back, few wanted to comment on the dissolution. Those that did were not in favor.

Some said they thought voters need more information to decide on dissolution.

”I think you need to know all of the facts to make an informed decision,” said Kathy Prescott, who as a town resident cannot vote on the dissolution issue, although she will be impacted.

“This will affect all of us,” said Lorna Hohn, another town resident. “What happens (with the vote) will affect the town, as well as the village.”

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