Press-Republican

Business

January 30, 2013

Gun owners question new state law

(Continued)

LAKE PLACID —

“If someone refuses to turn in a 30-round magazine, will it be confiscated?” Barry asked.

“No, unless the police have probable cause and a warrant,” Bruen, a Warren County attorney, answered.

Fazio did tell reporters that he thought tighter regulation of ammunition and assault weapons would help “keep them out of the hands of people who shouldn’t have them.”

STORING GUNS

Other components of the law require safe storage, meaning owners will have to lock their guns if they live with someone who has been convicted of a felony or domestic-violence crime or if they live with someone who has been involuntarily committed to a mental-health program.

“The idea is not to go in and get people’s weapons,” Bruen said.

Assault weapon registration, pistol permits and earlier background checks do not negate the need for background checks whenever gun owners buy ammunition.

Email Kim Smith: kdedam@pressrepublican.com

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TO LEARN MORE

  • A hotline staffed by State Police personnel is available for question from the public: 800-LAWGUNS (529-4867).

     
  • The entire definition of assault rifle and a timeline of when new laws become effective is available at NYSAFE Act.com

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