Press-Republican

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September 27, 2013

Lewis Heights plan approved

PLATTSBURGH — Plans for Lewis Heights, an 88-unit apartment complex in the City of Plattsburgh, have been approved.

Local developer James Latinville plans to build the one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments on 5 acres of the 17-acre property at the intersection of New York Road and U.S. Avenue. 



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“I’m very pleased with the final approval and eager to begin the project. It’s been almost a year in progress,” he said.

‘READY BY NEXT FALL’

The apartments would be built in four phases, with a timetable based on demand.

Latinville said he wants to finalize construction plans this winter so work could start around March. The first phase could be complete by early next fall, barring any unforeseen issues, he said. 

The City Planning Board approved the plans in the project’s fifth appearance before the board, although the first was only an informational session.

It was tabled last month as the Planning Board and Engineering Department sought more information.

STORMWATER SYSTEM

Aaron Ovios of Robert M. Sutherland PC, the engineering firm for the project, again provided details. That included more information about the stormwater management system.

“Our office has been working with Kevin’s (City Engineer Kevin Farrington) dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s on the stormwater system,” Ovios said.

Plans call for pervious pavement, which allows stormwater to seep into the ground under the pavement rather than run off to drains or detention areas. There would also be underground stormwater-retention areas rather than ground-level detention ponds.

In addition to a better appearance, it makes more of the property available for use, Latinville said.

Farrington said he believes the project won’t have a significant impact on the city’s stormwater system.

INTERIOR COURTYARD

The three-story buildings would include two walkways that allow them to be considered two structures. The buildings would be placed in a rectangular formation, which would create a large interior courtyard.

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