Press-Republican

Business

March 31, 2014

Young entrepreneurs pitch their dreams at PSU

Experts judge inventions, business plans

(Continued)

PLATTSBURGH —

For Plattsburgh State students Ryan Emmons and Anthony Pena-Nunez, inspiration came more recently. The business idea that they presented, “Delivery Mart,” would offer delivery of groceries to college students. Customers would be able to order items through an app. Emmons and Pena-Nunez proposed a flat rate of $8 per order in the hopes that low prices would lead to repeat customers.

However, like the other contestants they had to face the judge’s tough questions. The profitability of “Delivery Mart” was challenged — at least at the proposed rate of $8 per grocery order.

HIGH-TECH INGENUITY

Matthew Burke of Clarkson proposed an idea that he believes combines profitability with environmental benefits.

His proposal was called “Steam Engine Technology.” Introducing the idea to the judges, Burke said with a touch of humor, “You may have guessed by the name that we’re going to use a steam engine for something.” 

He went on to propose a method of converting sugar into ethanol — with a steam engine as part of the process. 

While many had looked to ethanol as an alternative to fossil fuels, inflation of food prices has been an unwanted result of ethanol production — since it is typically made from corn.

Using sugar instead of corn, Burke explained, would “minimize the impact on food supply.”

Burke hopes to raise capital by May, and then build and test a prototype by August. In the long run, he said, “Our strategy is to reinvest profits to fund further research and development.”

Another idea with social implications was offered by Clarkson students Erik Worden, Lauren Magin, Salvatore Riniolo and Lorraine Njoki. They appeared to be going back to basics — with an invention that Worden described as “a new method of boiling water.”

But it’s a method of boiling water that does not require electricity or fuel, relying instead on a rotary motor. The teammates believes this makes it ideal for developing regions, and hopes that it would lead to the wider availability of safe drinking water.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Business
Colin Read's Column

Business Spotlight
Peter Hagar's Farm Column

Farm Briefs
Videos: Business News
Looming Demand Could Undercut Flight Safety Six Indicted in StubHub Hacking Scheme Trump: DC Hotel Will Be Among World's Best AP Review: Amazon Fire Adds Spark to Smartphones All Aboard! LIRR Strike Averted Microsoft to Cut Up to 18,000 Jobs Time Warner Rejects Murdoch's Takeover Bid Yellen Says Economy Still Needs Fed Support Cleveland Expects Economic Boom From Lebron Justice Dept. Fines Citigroup $7 Billion Justice Dept. Fines Citigroup $7 Billion Downside of Low Mortgage Rates? Less Selling Cupcake Shop Crumbs Shuttering All Its Stores San Francisco Prepares for Soda Battle Dow Breaks Record 17,000 GM Crash Compensation Could Top $1 Billion GM Won't Limit Crash Compensation Funds