Press-Republican

Local News

January 12, 2010

Senator hopes governor’s message is heard

PLATTSBURGH — State Sen. Betty Little is hoping that Gov. David Paterson’s State of the State speech last week will spur the legislature to make the necessary changes to bring the state back to financial stability.

“I don’t know how they (state legislators) can’t see the handwriting on the wall,” Little said during a recent interview with the Press-Republican Editorial Board.

“I think the governor’s speech alluded to that.”

Little touched on several topics during her hour-long interview.



JOB CREATION

With the state’s finances in trouble and the nation still trying to recover from a recession, Little said the key is to create jobs.

“We need to get companies in here, and we need to create a better business climate for businesses to want to come here,” she said.

“The biggest focus for me — and I think any elected official — is get some more jobs created.”



CONVENTION

Republicans in the Assembly have been pushing to hold a Constitutional Convention in order to change the way the state does business.

Little thinks the idea is fine but would be costly.

Convention supporters say a convention could cost between $12 million and $20 million.

“We could make a lot of the changes they want with amendments to the constitution,” she said.

Little also said that any delegates to a convention should not be elected officials.



APA ISSUES

On the Adirondack Park Agency and issues in the park, Little remains frustrated over some ideas that are being floated, especially the proposed restriction on flat boat-house roofs.

Pitched roofs, which the APA wants to require, would prevent owners from using the boat-house roof as a sun deck, as many Adirondackers do.

Little said the idea is unnecessary because it has no environmental tie-in and will infringe on property owners.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News

North Country Scenes


Click on photo to view gallery with latest photos

FYI...
  • Stepping forward: The real Colbert

    Letterman changed the late-night TV game between his run on NBC's "Late Night" and starting the "Late Show" franchise in 1993. And while it's tough to replace a pop-culture icon, Colbert, in terms of pedigree and sense of humor, makes the most sense.

    April 16, 2014