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September 15, 2013

Business briefs: Sept. 15, 2013

Education program

PLATTSBURGH — Georgia-Pacific has sponsored five educators to attend the 2013 Founders Fellowship Program.

Attendees will study what it means to live in a free society, how America’s founding principles shape the country and how they have evolved. These are just some of the topics that the program discusses. Geared toward helping teachers educate students about America’s founders and their ideas, this conference gives secondary teachers the training needed to effectively teach economic and civil liberty.

Georgia-Pacific sponsored five high-school teachers from Alabama, New York, Oregon and Wisconsin to attend the week-long conference in Washington, D.C., July 22 to 26. Local Social Studies teacher Chris Hartmann from Stafford Middle School represented Plattsburgh. Teachers from Georgia-Pacific’s 200 facility communities across the country were eligible to apply.

“As part of the Georgia-Pacific Foundation’s focus on education and entrepreneurship, we support programs that teach practical economic principles and the benefits of a free-enterprise system,” said Curley Dossman, president of the Georgia-Pacific Foundation. “We realize the value of teaching these concepts to young people, and the Founders Fellowship program aims to help educators be better equipped to bring these complex concepts to life for students.”

Aimed at civics, history, government and economics teachers, one of the program goals is to help the next generation understand the Constitution and the freedoms and opportunities it provides. The conference offers lectures by constitutional scholars and classroom lessons on topics including property and commerce and the Constitution, public-policy debates about central economic planning and Supreme Court decisions regarding property rights, among others.

Teachers also visited historic sites including the National Archives and Mount Vernon and toured national monuments. Participants were eligible to receive 30 hours of continuing learning credits and received lesson-plan ideas aligned with national and state standards to bring back to the classroom.

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