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October 14, 2012

Dogs taken away from Mooers Forks man

MOOERS — Seventeen of 26 Walker hounds seized in an alleged abuse case still don’t have homes.

And Clifford Leafloor of Mooers Forks is due back in court Nov. 15 to face 19 charges of animal cruelty.

Nineteen undernourished adult dogs and seven puppies were seized from Leafloor’s Bush Road home Sept. 16 after Ellenburg-based State Police received a complaint from Animal Shelter owner and Mooers Dog Control Officer Kaleigh LaBombard.

An emaciated Walker hound had been brought to her by a person who found the dog wandering the streets.

The stray, who she called Lucky, might have died if not for that good Samaritan, she said.

“I took him to the vet ... He was extremely emaciated,” LaBombard said. 

She posted a photo of the hound on the shelter’s Facebook page, along with details describing his journey around town, and soon support and well-wishes started pouring in.

LaBombard later received other calls about more dogs that were allegedly living in unacceptable conditions on the expansive property that spans about 300 acres.

Assistant District Attorney Douglas Collyer, who is charge of prosecuting the case, confirmed in an email that Leafloor was arrested the same day the dogs were seized.

“Obviously, in a case like this we’re concerned for the animals first and foremost and getting them adopted out to good homes,” Collyer said. “So, I moved for and conducted a hearing that would order him to pay for the dogs’ care while the case is pending.”

MANY AT HEARING

At the late September hearing, Mooers Town Justice David Kokes said that, unless Leafloor came up with $7,460 by 5 p.m. Oct. 3, the animals would remain in LaBombard’s care at the Mooers Animal Shelter.

She watched the clock and her phone intently that day, and the judge’s deadline came and went.

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