Press-Republican

Local News

April 21, 2013

Warriors welcome in Lake Placid

LAKE PLACID — In battle, warriors don’t often retreat.

But in coming home, retreat means something wholly different.

Homeward Bound Adirondacks provided respite to more than 300 soldiers and their families at a recent welcome weekend in Lake Placid.

Family events encompassed art, music, storytelling, a campfire and hiking, while evening child care gave soldiers and their spouses time to go out on the town.

TIME TOGETHER

Jesse Colby, a soldier with the Transition Unit of the 385th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, spent part of that Saturday afternoon making masks with his wife, Bryn, and their three children, Brady, 5, Charlotte, 3, and even little Griffin, 5 months old.

“We love it,” Mr. Colby said of the weekend mountain get-away.

Brady smiled as he held up the face mask he had made while his dad brushed on the last few touches of paint.

“As a family, we love the way they organized this weekend,” Mr. Colby said. “They made it affordable, and to get out, especially in the spring, is great.”

Mr. Brady has worked as a military air-traffic controller at stations around the world.  He is looking now toward his next steps in civilian life.

With three small children, Mrs. Brady said, the weekend retreat was a welcome break from the daily routine.

“I really appreciate it, especially because of the budget cuts,” she said.

“The Army trimmed their family retreat spending, and that was always a neat time and a great thing for us as a family. When we heard about this, we immediately wanted to come.

“Tonight,” she added with anticipation, “I’m going out to dinner with my husband and my friends, and I won’t have to plan dinner for the children or share my plate!”

HUNDREDS ATTEND

The weekend event was provided through a grant to Homeward Bound Adirondacks by High Peaks Resort.

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