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December 1, 2010

Film focuses attention on lake algae

PLATTSBURGH — A new film focusing on the health of Lake Champlain offers a grim look at what the film's producers call a "lake in decline."

"Bloom, The Plight of Lake Champlain" examines several factors that may be responsible for increased levels of blue-green algae throughout the lake. Blue-green algae is a potentially toxic plant that has attracted growing concern over the past few summers.

"There's been a lot of news coverage of algae blooms, but the news has been more about the blooms themselves and less about the causes," said Jon Erickson, the film's executive producer.

FRUSTRATION

Erickson, a professor and managing director for the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont, hopes the film can become an "entryway for discussion about the root causes" of increased algae growth in the lake.

"There has been a sense of frustration that we continue to spend a lot of money on lake-cleanup efforts that seem to be doing what's politically feasible and not what's economically or ecologically feasible."

EXPERTS, CITIZENS

Academy Award-winning actor Chris Cooper narrates the film. Cooper has appeared in such films as "American Beauty," "The Bourne Identity" and "Me, Myself and Irene."

His narration is woven around quotes from several key players in Lake Champlain management, including University of Vermont professor Mary Watzin, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Justin Johnson and Eric Smeltzer from the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources.

"We were also able to talk to various people on the front lines," Erickson said of interviews with citizens involved in grassroots organizations that follow lake-related activities.

"It was important for us to get the voice of the everyday man and woman who are impacted by this every day of their lives." But the true star is Lake Champlain itself, with video clips of a pristine lake overshadowed by dramatic glimpses of algae blooms dotting the water's surface.

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