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August 30, 2013

Drug sweep uncovers more than expected

SARANAC LAKE — Saranac Lake Police say that during Wednesday’s countywide drug sweep, they happened upon methamphetamine precursors, which has led to several charges against suspects not on the original list.

The sweep nabbed 34 people in Malone and Saranac Lake, one of the biggest busts in recent history.

And, because of the unforeseen evidence found during the sweep, two others have been arrested. Shannon J. Emmons, 25, and Joseph Williams, 27, both of Saranac Lake, were each charged with criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine, a felony; third-degree unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine, a felony, and seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, a misdemeanor.

SETTING OUT EARLY

On the Saranac Lake front, the drug sweep started with a 7 a.m. briefing at the station, said Saranac Lake Police Chief Bruce Nason.

Then officers split up, with some going to look for two suspects in an apartment at 155 Broadway St.

While they didn’t find the pair they were looking for, police did discover Emmons and Williams, along with Coleman fuel, cold packs and disassembled batteries — all meth precursors, Nason said.

“All of the ingredients that would be used to make meth were there except for the pseudoephedrine.”

Police obtained a search warrant for the apartment and uncovered a small amount of meth, the chief said.

HIDING

Police also found, hiding in a closet in that apartment, Bernard J. McCormick, 29, of North Bangor, who was arrested there on a warrant for failure to appear for a conference in Franklin County Court, Nason said.

McCormick was sent to Franklin County Jail to await arraignment in Franklin County Court.

Emmons and Williams were taken to the Franklin County Jail in lieu of $10,000 cash or $20,000 bond for each of them.

‘THE MOST HEROIN’

When officers searched another residence in the same apartment building, they uncovered six ounces of heroin, two ounces of crack cocaine, as well as LSD and ecstasy, Nason said.

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