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September 7, 2013

Another grand jury to hear Trombly case

PLATTSBURGH — Ronald R. Trombly’s manslaughter case will be heard by another grand jury before the end of the year.

Judge Kevin Ryan issued the order on Friday, approving Clinton County District Attorney Andrew Wylie’s Aug. 21 application to resubmit the charges in the case, according to a news release from the DA’s Office.

“Due to the nature of this matter, I will not be making any additional comments on the proceeding until after the matter has been submitted to the grand jury,” Wylie said in an email.

NO INDICTMENT

On Aug. 6, a grand jury chose to not indict Trombly, 85, who was charged with second-degree manslaughter and other charges after, on May 20, the car he was driving allegedly hit Ashley Poissant, 27, as she was jogging along Perry Mills Road in Champlain with three others.

Another grand jury will hear the case for Trombly’s indictment in the final term of the year, which runs from Sept. 17 to Dec. 31, according to the DA’s Office.

New York State Criminal Procedure Law section 190.75 allows a second grand-jury deliberation on the case.

It may be heard only twice, however, according to the law.

Poissant died at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington the day after the crash; an autopsy determined the cause was a skull-fracture brain injury due to blunt force impact.

Among the other felony charges that will again be considered in Trombly’s case are second-degree vehicular manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide.

The misdemeanor charges to be brought again are third-degree assault and two counts of driving while intoxicated. Two counts of failure to use due care to avoid a pedestrian will also be given to the new grand jury for consideration.

NEW DETAILS

The DA’s Office released new information on Friday about the fatal incident, saying it happened after Trombly left Patriot’s Pub in the Village of Champlain.

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