Press-Republican

Local News

April 14, 2013

Parents look to help children's museum grow

PLATTSBURGH — The idea for a children’s museum in the North Country began one night as a group of friends sat around a dining-room table.

Each wanted a way for their children to be able to interact with other kids, have fun, stimulate their minds and learn skills that would eventually benefit them in elementary school and later in life.

From that get-together, the Imaginarium Children’s Museum of the North Country was born.

Just about few years later, the museum is a reality and looking to grow.

NEXT STEP

Museum President Jennifer Meschinelli said that after a couple of years of organizing, soul searching and rallying, they concluded there was a real need for such a place.

“As a result, we began thinking more seriously and believing that this could really happen,” she said at a kickoff for the museum’s most recent event, Blast Boredom campaign.

“We moved into this building about a year ago, and we are really happy with how it’s been supported. Now we need to take the next step to grow.”

They are already outgrowing the site, a large building at 4709 Route 9 South, Plattsburgh, especially with plans that eventually call for an outdoor space and larger indoor play areas.

“Part of our plans include a giant Lite Bright, a huge pirate ship and a massive lighted music floor,” Meschinelli said. “They take money, but they are not just for fun. The Lite Brite encourages sensory skills, the pirate ship helps with motor skills and the dance floor with movement and physical development.”

VOLUNTEER BASE

The present building is arranged into two basic areas. Birthday parties and meetings are held on one side, while the museum’s hands-on displays are on the other.

The staff and board will be considering whether to stay where they are, move to another location or build a new facility.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Breaking News
New Today
Local News

North Country Scenes


Click on photo to view gallery with latest photos

FYI...
  • Stepping forward: The real Colbert

    Letterman changed the late-night TV game between his run on NBC's "Late Night" and starting the "Late Show" franchise in 1993. And while it's tough to replace a pop-culture icon, Colbert, in terms of pedigree and sense of humor, makes the most sense.

    April 16, 2014