Press-Republican

Local News

August 9, 2012

Towers going up

CLINTON — Components of 492-foot turbine towers are rolling into northern Clinton County for Marble River Wind Farm.

There are 16 towers going up in the Town of Ellenburg and another 56 in the Town of Clinton, each with the ability to produce 3 megawatts of electricity.

The project, owned by EDP Renewables, formerly known as Horizon Wind Energies, could generate a maximum 216 megawatts once fully online.

Motorists along State Route 11 wait at intersections as massive blades and giant tubular sections are trucked by under police escort into Churubusco and Ellenburg Center.

Project Manager Brian Dunneback said about one third of the towers are finished.

“We’re in construction now and have about 25 up, and we anticipate being operational by late October,” he said.

TALLEST IN STATE

Massive cranes lift the component parts into place to create the towers, which are the tallest wind-farm turbines in New York state.

Typical tower heights are 365 feet.

Marble River’s original plan was to create 109 towers to generate 2.1 megawatts each, but the taller towers and improved turbine gearboxes increased energy efficiency and reduced the project size by one third, yet retained permitted electricity output, Dunneback said.

This project is different than some older wind farms in that it will have buried transmission lines, and fewer access roads will be built.

The State Public Service Commission approved an amended permit for the project in June.

Once operational, Marble River will give Clinton County the largest wind-energy capacity in the state.

Email Denise A. Raymo: draymo@pressrepublican.com

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