Press-Republican

Local News

August 6, 2012

Generations of knitting

Self-taughtknitter's workis based onrelative's design

KEESEVILLE — When Yvonne Jock does her dishes, it is with beautiful, colorful, soft, textured hand-knit dishcloths.

“My husband’s aunt (Eileen Lamica) used to make them,” said Jock, a Morrisonville resident. She and her husband, Gil, own Snowshoe Publishing and sell the dishcloths along with Connie Cassevaugh-illustrated coasters, note cards, magnetic note pads and blank recipe cards at area farmers markets.

This Wednesday, she was at the Keeseville Farmers Market.

“They’re (made with) 100 percent cotton grown in the United States and made in the United States, because I make them,” Jock said.

MADE IN AMERICA

She experimented with different cottons before settling on one made in America that had a fullness to the touch. Ridges in the finished cloth aid in cleaning.

“I have been dong this all my life. It’s just a regular knit,” she said.

Jock is a self-taught knitter.

“You have to persevere with it, practice, practice, practice. I taught my 16-year-old granddaughter (Courtney Rorhrig) to do this. It took a weekend. The tradition goes on to another generation,” she said.

MEMORIES OF MOM

From her late homemaker mother, Blanche Rabideau, Jock learned how to cook.

“She used to make homemade rolls and pies. She was a master of large meals for a lot of people,” she said.

Rabideau was a Depression-era baby.

“She made mayonnaise cake and tomato soup cake. Anyone of my generation will say, ‘I remember that,’” Jock added.

The publishing company is a venture Jock participates in when she wants to.

The Jocks are both retired, but their response is “We’re busier than ever” when friends and family ask, she said.

She wonders how she had time to do anything when she was entrenched in the workforce.

“It was very difficult at the time,” she said. “I worked two jobs and managed a household with two children.”

Despite the modern conveniences of dish washer, washer and dryer, kitchen gadgets galore, Jock thinks modern woman and man work hard.

“I do scratch cooking and a lot of things like that,” she said. “Doing this allows me to do it on my own terms. Being retired, I can pick and choose where I want to go.

Email Robin Caudell:

rcaudell@pressrepublican.com

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