Press-Republican

Local News

February 2, 2012

Republican woman enters race for Congress

— Kellie Greene seeks seat in Congress, touts herself as conservative

PLATTSBURGH — Kellie Greene, a self-described conservative Republican from Sackets Harbor, has entered the race for the 23rd Congressional District seat.

"I am just sick and tired of the same old, same old, same old situation," she told the Press-Republican.

"It's not just a Bill Owens (incumbent) issue. I am tired of yelling at my television, and I am frustrated with a do-nothing Congress.

"I don't feel that they are there for the right reasons. They are supposed to be there for the people. It's about representing the people, and they are just spending money like water, and it just doesn't work."

PRIMARY

Greene will be seeking the Republican Party nod to take on incumbent Owens (D-Plattsburgh) in the November election. She will face off against Republican Matt Doheny, and possibly others, in a Republican primary on June 26.

She officially kicked off her campaign with an event in Watertown Wednesday night.

OSWEGO NATIVE

A native of Oswego, Greene, 44, moved back to the district last year after spending the last eight years in Arizona working in the global trade and logistics field and in real estate.

She has an associate's degree from Bay Path College in business administration, a Bachelor of Science degree from Syracuse University in logistics management and a master's in business administration from Rochester Institute of Technology in international business.

She is completing a Master of Arts in theology at Fuller Seminary School, expecting to graduate in June.

Greene, who is single, said she believes firmly in the U.S. Constitution and is a fiscal and social conservative.

She favors fewer regulations on business, reducing the size and scope of government, ensuring a strong military and a foreign policy that supports Israel.

She is pro-life and against gay marriage.

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