Press-Republican

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October 25, 2012

Two square off for Schuyler Falls justice position

SCHUYLER FALLS — Two candidates are seeking the position of Schuyler Falls town justice for a four-year term.

Randall Cumm, a retired member of the State Police, is running as a Republican, and David Jock, a retired member of the Clinton County Sheriff’s Department, is on the Democrat ticket.

The justice seat has been vacant since March 21, when longtime Justice Richard H. Reome Sr. resigned as part of a deal with the state’s Commission on Judicial Conduct.

The commission said he mishandled cases; Reome told the Press-Republican he chose to resign rather than go to trial to clear his name because that would cause physical and emotional stress that he was not up to enduring.

Though his term would have expired at the end of 2013, the candidate elected in November will not complete only the remaining year. Instead, a new four-year term will begin in January 1013, as is done with justice positions, according to the Clinton County Board of Elections.

KNOWLEDGE OF LAW

Knowing the law is only part of the job, Cumm told the Press-Republican in a recent interview.

“Because when a judge makes a decision, it may reach beyond the courtroom. It requires a special type of wisdom, gained only through experience, which gives a judge and the judge’s decision insight into the ramifications that may result beyond the person’s standing before the court.”

The experience he would bring to the post was gained in the U.S. Navy, as a manager of Agway stores and as a State Police sergeant and investigator.

”I have supervised others, enforced the laws of New York, conducted numerous criminal investigations, solved crimes, and I have testified in courts.

”In addition, as an instructor at the New York State Police Academy, by instructing the laws we are all required to live by, I obtained a deeper understanding and knowledge of the laws I will be required to use in my position as town justice.

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