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September 25, 2013

Encampment, festival this weekend

BURKE — A harvest festival and Civil War encampment are among the events to be hosted Saturday and Sunday by the Almanzo and Laura Ingalls Wilder Association.

About 40 re-enactors are expected at the Wilder Homestead on Stacy Road where Almanzo Wilder spent his youth.

The site was the setting of his wife’s popular book, “Farmer Boy.”

The re-enactors will open their camps at 9 a.m. Saturday, with live demonstrations, drills and interaction with visitors about camp life.

A Union payroll skit is scheduled for 11 a.m., followed at 2 p.m. with a battle before the camps close for the day at 4 p.m.

On Sunday, the camps will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., when another battle will be fought.

Association President Carlton Stickney will display Civil War-era household items and military artifacts and conduct a chair-caning demonstration.

Other participants will demonstrate weaving, quilting and other skilled works.

Pieces accepted for the “As Time Passes” juried art and photography show will be on display at the association’s museum in the gift shop throughout the weekend. Visitors will be invited to select their favorite for the “People’s Choice” award.

Guided tours of the Wilder family home and its grounds, the historically accurate barns, pump house and the homestead’s 1860s one-room schoolhouse will be available all weekend.

Harvest Festival activities include entertainment by North Wind, pumpkin painting for children, 19th-century games in the apple orchard and corn pit, and readings from “Farmer Boy.”

Admission on Saturday is $5 for adults and $3 for ages 6 to 16, and Sunday’s charge is $7.50 for adults, $7 for seniors and $4 for ages 6 to 16. Parking is free.

For information about the events and activities, visit www.almanzowilderfarm.com call 483-1207, send an email to farm@almanzowilderfarm.com or check out the association’s Facebook page.

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