Press-Republican

Local News

September 19, 2013

Jay trail to honor memory of local child

AUSABLE FORKS — Community leaders in the towns of Jay and Black Brook are working to create a trail in memory of a 7-year-old boy in Grove Pattno/Gale Memorial Park.

The town will hold a public information forum at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, at the Town of Jay Community Center in AuSable Forks to present the plans for Henry’s Trail, and those interested in volunteering their time to help build it will have a chance that night to sign up.

Jay Town Supervisor Randy Douglas said they’ve raised about $30,000 so far toward a goal of $55,000.

“Over the years, I have watched the Pattno/Gale Memorial Park continue to grow with the help of many generous individuals, groups and organizations,” he said in a news release.

CAITO FOUNDATION GIFT

In addition, earlier this year, the Town of Jay received a $10,000 New York State Creating Healthy Places grant to help offset the cost of the new play area in the Grove Park.

Soon afterward, resident Greg Caito, on behalf of his wife, Lisa, and their family, visited Douglas to discuss a donation that would help fund new recreational activities there.

The donation is in the memory of the Caitos’ son, Henry, who died in a 2011 car accident that also took the life of Henry’s grandmother, Theresa Rose Marcoccia Caito, who was 75.

The Henry Caito Foundation was established after the accident and has given $10,000 toward the new Grove Wilderness Play Area.

The Jay Town Council unanimously voted for the Play Area to be named “Henry’s Trail” in honor of the child.

Henry’s Trail will consist of several pods, with each one representing an Adirondack species theme: the honey bee; the bear, which was Henry’s favorite creature; the snowshoe hare/cottontail rabbit; the bald eagle/red-tailed hawk; the fisher; and the deer mouse. 

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