Press-Republican

Local News

March 22, 2013

Saranac Central superintendent search postponed

SARANAC — Saranac Central School Superintendent Ken Cringle has signed on to serve the district for another year. 

Cringle, who has worked for the district for 35 years, announced in November 2012 that he would retire as superintendent on July 1, 2013.

The School Board launched a search for a new district leader shortly after Cringle made known his plans to retire. However, that search was terminated at Wednesday’s board meeting due to a lack of candidates.

“The board was very disappointed in not only the quality but the quantity of candidates applying,” Cringle told the Press-Republican.

That being the case, the board consulted with him and made the decision to extend his contract through June 30, 2014. 

The board felt doing so was in the best interest of Saranac Central, according to a media release, as the district is just beginning a capital-improvement project and is implementing a number of state and federal initiatives. 

Cringle said that while it was a difficult decision to delay his retirement for a year, the choice was made easier by his committed interest in the school, where his children and wife, Donna, both attended and his grandchild is currently a student. 

“I’m passionate about this district,” he said. 

Saranac Central has a wonderful community, Cringle noted.

And it has a caring and dedicated staff of professionals and a School Board made up of members who are child-centered and demand the best possible outcomes for students, he added. 

It is important to Cringle that the school find the right person to replace him, he said. 

“The board appreciates Mr. Cringle’s willingness to place his retirement on hold to serve as the superintendent of schools for an additional year and knows that his experience and leadership skills will continue to guide this district in a productive and positive manner,” the release said. 

Saranac Central plans to begin another search for Cringle’s successor early this fall. 

Email Ashleigh Livingston:alivingston@pressrepublican.com

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