Press-Republican

Local News

January 6, 2013

Climate-change assemblies this week at area schools

TUPPER LAKE — Following its North Country premier at the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit last November, the Alliance for Climate Education will return to the area for a “blitz week.”

Monday through Friday this week, the Alliance for Climate Education will hold school-wide assemblies at 14 high schools, reaching more than 4,000 students.

The Alliance for Climate Education is a national nonprofit dedicated to educating America’s high-school students about the science behind climate change and inspiring them to do something about it — while having fun along the way.

The free, award-winning, multimedia assembly educates students about climate change and inspires them to take action.

Afterwards, the alliance supports school Action Teams taking on carbon-cutting projects by providing free resources, including project ideas, leadership training and grants. Learn more at www.acespace.org.

Schools hosting assemblies are Brushton Moira Central, Canton High School, Colton-Pierrepont Central, Elizabethtown-Lewis Central, Franklin Academy, Indian River High School, Keene Central, Lake Placid High School, Long Lake Central, Moriah Central, Northwood School, Plattsburgh High School, Saranac Lake High School, St. Regis Falls Central and Tupper Lake High School.

The assemblies build on the success of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit. More than 160 participants from 28 high schools and colleges across the Adirondacks and New York state attended the 2012 event.

The summit is the only one of its kind in the country and has already led to financial savings and shifts in mindsets across the Adirondack Park, organizers said in a news release.

“Students who participated last year returned to their schools implementing change — creating school gardens to provide food for their cafeterias, expanding recycling and composting programs, replacing power strips with energy-smart strips, examining energy-saving opportunities by conducting carbon audits for their schools and presenting to school boards about their activities and financial savings.”

1
Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local News

North Country Scenes


Click on photo to view gallery with latest photos

FYI...
  • Stepping forward: The real Colbert

    Letterman changed the late-night TV game between his run on NBC's "Late Night" and starting the "Late Show" franchise in 1993. And while it's tough to replace a pop-culture icon, Colbert, in terms of pedigree and sense of humor, makes the most sense.

    April 16, 2014