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June 19, 2013

New Adirondack Council director looks to common ground

(Continued)

In that meeting, Janeway said, he saw how momentum for growth doesn’t necessarily — or arbitrarily — discard wise land-use planning.

And, he said, he also saw how land-use regulation can imply unintended, negative economic impacts.

PARTNERSHIPS

Janeway believes park-wide land-use regulations work best when “designed and managed on ecosystem principles that include community. The people of the park live a very green lifestyle, by choice.”

That people can and do live in harmony with nature here is a message he says is unique when told from an Adirondack perspective.

He said the key to success in finding common ground is in building partnerships.

“If we work together, it makes it easy,” he said.

THE WHOLE PARK

And in that big-picture view, he said, science-based initiatives need to look at the whole park, including the people who live and work in it.

Janeway says regulation established under the Adirondack Park Agency Act 40 or so years ago has not kept pace with new science and scientific technology that, he believes, could support both growth and environmental protection.

He named broadband access as a key example of important technology for the people here.

A lot of environmental science has happened since 1971 when the APA was formed, he added.

“We would like to see the APA commissioners appointed and given support to follow the science and follow the laws. We also, in terms of strategy, would update a vision of what the Adirondack Park should look like in 2092.”

The Adirondack Council sees promise in a process being designed by APA to transfer development rights.

“We see the transfer of development rights as a progressive planning tool,” Janeway said.

Really, he said, the Adirondack Council’s APA Act reform initiative is centered in an effort to bring land use into the 21st century with a focus on science, specifically as it pertains to forest management and clear-cutting initiatives; water quality as it is affected by stormwater management; and invasive species.

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