Press-Republican

Local News

June 16, 2013

Locals join Albany rally against testing, data collection

(Continued)

“In many ways, we can be hurt so bad by identity theft, and our children could be, too, in the future with this type of data mining. Why would put our kids at such great risk? 

“Also, why would we want private businesses to know so much? I think this is unethical, and we are right now at that moment where even more personal space is being invaded without our permission.”

As far as mining student information, Garcia-Notario wondered who would determine the appropriate track for success when every child is unique and different?

“This could create labels for kids. People shine when the right moment gets to them. We should be the first to advocate for our students.”

PARENTS PROTEST

Federal testing, some believe, is driven by corporate data-collection. 

“There’s a real awakening,” Carlisto said.

Already, state lawmakers, including Assemblywoman Janet Duprey (R-Peru), have sponsored bills that would prevent schools from releasing personally identifiable student information without parental consent.

Haimson’s website, Class Size Matters, tracks the progress of InBloom’s pilot program.

“As of May 2013, only three states are still committed to going forward: New York, Illinois (Bloomington), and Colorado (Jefferson Co.),” Haimson said in a recent update.

And by June 1, New York remained the only state sharing data, involving the personal information of 2.6 million students.

“New York … has reportedly already uploaded this information on the inBloom cloud.”

CONSOLIDATED RECORDS

Reuters reported recently that “the system is set up to identify millions of children by name, race, economic status and other metrics and is constructed in a way that makes it easy for school districts to share some or all of that information with private companies developing education software.

“The idea is that consolidated records make it easier for teachers to use software that mines data to identify academic weaknesses. Games, videos or lesson plans would then be precisely targeted to engage specific children or promote specific skills.”

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