Press-Republican

Local News

January 11, 2014

Many agencies search for missing man

SARANAC LAKE — Numerous agencies continued searching Friday for Paul McKay, the Australian missing in the Adirondacks since about Dec. 31. 

Paul McKay’s military training, physical fitness and the winter clothing he wore when he was last seen on Dec. 31 “make it likely that he is well prepared to survive in winter conditions,” Saranac Village Police said in a media release on Friday.

The search for the Australian is focused on a general area between Ray Brook and Lake Placid. 

Earlier in the week, the release said, three DEC forest rangers and a State Police Aviation Unit helicopter performed preliminary ground and air searches between Saranac Lake and Ray Brook.

They failed to locate any sign of the missing man.

On Thursday, eight forest rangers executed search assignments, including two assigned as spotters on the helicopter, again with no results. 

However, the release said, “Saranac Lake Police continue to receive information daily from the public regarding missing person Paul McKay.” 

McKay, an active member of the Australian Army, was spotted walking on Route 86 at about 11 a.m. Dec. 31, carrying a large backpack and heading toward Lake Placid from Saranac Lake.

His father, John McKay, told officials his son suffers from post traumatic stress disorder.

Assisting Saranac Lake Police with the search are State Department of Environmental Conservation forest rangers, State Police, Lake Placid Village Police, Tupper Lake Village Police, the Clinton County Sheriff’s Department, Elmira City Police Department, Adams County Sheriff’s Department in Pennsylvania and the National Parks Service. 

Lt. Colonel Rob Crawford has come to the region as a representative of the Australian Defense Force and Australian Consulate. 

Anyone with information is asked to call Saranac Lake Police at 891-4428 or the DEC at 897-1300.

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