Press-Republican

Local News

November 2, 2012

Ganienkeh property up for tax auction

ALTONA — For the first time, Clinton County has put Ganienkeh property up for tax auction.

The Mohawk community is long overdue to pay taxes on the parcels, according to Clinton County Treasurer Joseph Giroux.

The property is not taxable, Mohawk leadership says.

And as for the coming auction, “Ganienkeh land is not for sale,” Mohawk spokesman Thomas Delaronde told the Press-Republican by phone Thursday afternoon.

INCLUDES GOLF COURSE

The auction details appeared Thursday on the website nysauctions.com, promoting the online-only sale set to begin at 9 a.m. Nov. 30 with 11 auction lots up for bid. They total more than 1,745-plus acres of land, all located in Altona and the Northern Adirondack Central School District. 

The properties include Ganienkeh Golf Course at 2927 Rand Hill Road, valued at $1,347,300; a dairy farm at 1037-1065 Alder Bend Road, assessed at $297,700; and a home at 100 Lash Road, valued at $99,000.

The land described on the site as “previously owned by the Turtle Island Trust, an entity believed to be controlled by the Ganienkeh people of Altona” also includes parcels of abandoned agricultural land on Lash, Rabideau and Devil’s Den roads; vacant farmland on Lash Road and Military Turnpike; and a vacant rural plot on Devil’s Den. 

Preview information on the website says inspection of the properties is available as “drive by only.”

The lands are near but not part of the expanse of property called home by the Ganienkeh Mohawk community since 1977 — state land that was leased to Turtle Island Trust after a three-year siege between the Mohawks and state in Moss Lake.

Bidding is to start Nov. 30.

COUNTY BURDEN

For five years, according to Clinton County Treasurer Joe Giroux, the Governor’s Office has attempted to reach some kind of resolution to the issue with Ganienkeh.

He took part in several meetings at the Governor’s Office in Albany, under four different governors. Mohawk leadership was present at some of those, he said.

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