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April 1, 2012

Farm briefs: April 1, 2012

Farm disaster-preparedness workshops set

KEESEVILLE — The Cornell Cooperative Extension Associations of Northern New York are offering Extension's new Farm Disaster Preparedness workshops.

The training will help farmers prevent and prepare for accidents involving farm vehicles on the road, on-farm fires or structure collapse, agricultural products storage and storm damage.

All types and sizes of farms, including dairy farms, are invited to attend this training in Keeseville at the AuSable Valley Grange from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, April 16.

Dealing with livestock injuries and biosecurity issues and reducing the opportunity for on-farm crime are also part of the workshop agenda.

Cornell Cooperative Extension Essex County Executive Director Anita Deming said the workshops cover potential problems on the farm and provide recommendations for preventing or minimizing impact.

"The goal is to avoid problems or reduce the cost of dealing with them," she said.

The training will help farmers increase their resilience to small and large disasters through planning and management readiness.

Farms that complete the training will receive a certificate to provide to their insurer as a condition of eligibility for receiving a credit, discount or preferred status.

The program fee is $35 and includes lunch and information materials. Preregistration is requested by April 13; contact Sharon or Judy at 962-4810 Ext. 0 or email essex@cornell.edu.

USDA to survey maple producers

ALBANY — The U.S. Department of Agriculture will be conducting a maple-syrup survey during April and May. Representatives from USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will be surveying producers in 10 of the nation's largest maple-producing states, including New York.

This survey will gather information on number of taps, yield, production, price and value of production in New York. Results from last year's survey established New York's rank as second in the nation for production of maple syrup behind Vermont.

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